Technology | July 23, 2014

Mobile App Helps Radiologists Spend More Time Making Quality Reports

A new version of RadsBest is now available

July 23, 2014 — The newest version of RadsBest has launched and is available as a free download for iOS devices from the Apple App Store. This mobile app short-circuits complex guidelines about management of radiologic findings, turning them into a simple tap-based interface. Created by Medocratic LLC, RadsBest helps radiologists improve the quality and consistency of their radiologic reports by making it simple to incorporate published guidelines and consensus statements into their reports. 

Research has shown busy radiologists do not use guidelines nearly as much as they would like. The app removes many hurdles by aggregating these guidelines in one place, making them quick to access and simple to navigate. Made by radiologists who understand the importance of efficiency, it works offline and employs a smart algorithm that minimizes unnecessary taps and screen changes. In other words, it is built for speed. 

The app includes a host of tools, including recent ACR white papers on the management of incidental findings, management of contrast reactions, premedication for contrast allergies and TNM staging for many cancers.

Version 1.1 of RadsBest has additional tools and incorporates in-app purchase-able content. It has been redesigned for iOS7 and now incorporates the ability to login with Doximity, LinkedIn and Facebook. Once logged in, the app works offline and does not contain any ads or promotional content New tools are added to the app regularly through the cloud. 

RadsBest is available as a free download for iOS devices from the Apple App Store.

For more information: www.radsbest.com

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