News | Artificial Intelligence | December 04, 2018

Mirada Medical Joins U.K. Consortium Exploring Healthcare AI

Company will be working with U.K institutions to advance development and adoption of artificial intelligence in radiotherapy treatment planning and diagnostic nuclear medicine

Mirada Medical Joins U.K. Consortium Exploring Healthcare AI

December 4, 2018 — Mirada Medical, a leading global brand in medical imaging software, will form part of an artificial intelligence (AI) consortium receiving £50M in new funding from the U.K. government. The funding is part of the government’s drive to expedite the development and adoption of AI in healthcare and the National Health System (NHS).

Mirada developed the first deep learning applications for radiotherapy planning to receive regulatory clearance for clinical use in both Europe and the U.S. The company will bring its expertise and practical experience to projects hosted by Kings College London and the University of Oxford, two of the five centers funded through Wave 2 of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s ‘Data to Early Diagnosis and Precision Medicine’initiative.

Mirada will be partnering with the London Medical Imaging & Artificial Intelligence Centre for Value-Based Healthcare, led by Kings College London, and will be working closely with Guys & St Thomas hospital. Mirada will be building on its success in commercializing its DLCExpert radiation therapy planning application to deliver the potential of AI to the NHS and demonstrate how advanced medical imaging and deep learning technologies can be used to improve patient care.    

Mirada will also partner with the University of Oxford’s NCIMI (National Consortium of Intelligent Medical Imaging) to investigate the role that AI and deep learning can play in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The company will be building on its established partnership with the Alliance Medical Group and the NHS positron emission tomography (PET) scanning program, where Mirada software is already used to read more than half of the PET/CT (computed tomography) scans in England & Wales.

These initiatives will improve the efficiency of cancer detection and diagnosis, leading to faster cancer treatment delivery, cost reductions for the NHS and improved patient outcomes.

Centre Director Professor Reza Razavi from King’s College London said: “The centre will provide a fantastic opportunity to transform 12 different patient pathways by using advanced imaging and AI and help make the products that will substantially improve the experience for our patients and their clinical outcomes. It will also allow us to better utilize the resources within the NHS. This builds on a great ongoing partnership between our researchers, clinicians and industry colleagues that will help put the UK at the forefront of developing and applying new technologies to improve healthcare.”

For more information: www.mirada-medical.com

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