Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | November 24, 2015

Medic Vision Introduces SafeCT-29 to Support XR-29 Compliance

Healthcare organizations can avoid CMS penalties while keeping their existing CT scanners

November 24, 2015 — Medic Vision Imaging Solutions Ltd. announced the introduction of SafeCT-29. Designed to be computed tomography (CT)-vendor neutral and compatible with the various makes and models of CT systems, SafeCT-29 helps meeting the NEMA XR-29 (Smart Dose) standard and avoiding Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) penalties. The product will be demonstrated at the upcoming Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 30 – Dec. 4 in Chicago.

NEMA estimated that one-third of the current CT installation base (4,000 scanners) would have to be replaced for the respective healthcare facility to avoid penalties, which are set at 5 percent in 2016 and 15 percent thereafter. The 4-slice, 8-slice and some 16-slide CT scanners, as well as most positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners are not supported by the original manufacturer to meet compliance. 

Protected by two pending patents, SafeCT-29 is an add-on system that is easy to install and operate. It is fully automatic and enables the technologist to maintain his or her existing workflow. SafeCT-29 connects to the CT console, analyzes dose data in real time, alerts the operator if the dose is too high, and prevents the patient scan until dose levels are changed or confirmed and justified. 

Pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, SafeCT-29 will be available directly from Medic Vision as well as through the company’s distribution partners.

For more information: www.medicvision.com

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