News | Advanced Visualization | September 07, 2017

Median Technologies to Lead Roundtable on Applications of iBiopsy for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Panelists will include four key opinion leaders in the fields of hepatology, liver imaging, biomarker and non-invasive test development and clinical trial design

Median Technologies to Lead Roundtable on Applications of iBiopsy for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

September 7, 2017 — Median Technologies announced that it will lead a scientific and medical roundtable on Sept. 7 in Sophia-Antipolis, France, to discuss the application of its next-generation imaging platform iBiopsy for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The roundtable panel will include four key opinion leaders:

  • Richard Jones, M.D., MRCP, vice president, general medicine, Princeton, N.J. Jones is a GMC-registered physician from the United Kingdom specializing in internal medicine, clinical pharmacology and cardiology. He qualified from the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford and has spent more than 15 years in academic medicine in the UK. Jones has over 70 publications on various aspects of drug development. He worked in early- and late-phase drug development holding senior positions in several major pharmaceutical companies. He has experience in developing novel biomarkers and non-invasive tests and their application to clinical trial methodologies;
  • Rohit Loomba, M.D., MHSc, University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Loomba is a professor of medicine (with tenure), director of hepatology, and vice chief, Division of Gastroenterology at UCSD. He is an internationally recognized thought leader in translational research and innovative clinical trial design in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and steatohepatitis (NASH), and in non-invasive assessment of steatosis and fibrosis using advanced imaging modalities;
  • Michael Middleton, M.D., Ph.D., UCSD. Together with others at UCSD, Middleton has developed and improved breath-hold quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) magnitude imaging and spectroscopic methods to assess liver fat, and has developed methods to assess the adequacy of MRI proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) liver stiffness assessment measurements. Middleton and his group use MRI to assess liver fat content in clinical trials for the NASH Clinical Research Network, and he currently serves on the Steering and Radiology Committees of the NASH CRN; and
  • Massimo Pinzani is professor of medicine at University College London (UCL), London, United Kingdom. He is a clinical and translational hepatologist, is the Sheila Sherlock Chair of Hepatology and director of the UCL Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, Division of Medicine.  Pinzani is one of the pioneers in research dedicated to cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and relative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

The roundtable will aim at providing scientific and medical insights and recommendations to support the development and strategic positioning of Median's  iBiopsy for NASH.

"Median Technologies is developing imaging biomarkers for the diagnosis and assessment of treatment response of NASH patients during clinical trials that will lead to the development of a companion diagnostic imaging test once a drug has been approved by the FDA [U.S. Food and Drug Administration]. Our plan is to have the imaging biomarker validated during the clinical trial becoming the basis for the companion diagnostic. We have been evaluating various imaging protocols and modalities including CT [computed tomography] contrast imaging and MR elastography combined with novel deep learning methodologies," said Fredrik Brag, CEO of Median Technologies. 

iBiopsy (Imaging Biomarker Phenotyping System) is a platform that combines non-invasive image biomarkers with phenomics. This combination of science and technology can provide insights into development of novel therapies and individualized treatment strategies. iBiopsy can measure disease and treatment response without an invasive and costly biopsy.

For more information: www.mediantechnologies.com

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