News | February 28, 2012

Mammography-Detected Breast Cancer in 40-49 Year-Olds Has Better Prognosis

February 27, 2012 — Based on a study of nearly 2,000 breast cancer patients, researchers at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle say that, in women between the ages of 40 and 49, breast cancers detected by mammography have a better prognosis. The study appears in the March issue of Radiology.

“In our study, women aged 40 to 49 whose breast cancer was detected by mammography were easier to treat and had less recurring disease and mortality, because their cancer was found at an earlier stage,” said Judith A. Malmgren, Ph.D., president of HealthStat Consulting Inc.

Malmgren and a team of researchers reviewed breast cancer patient data from a dedicated registry at the Swedish Cancer Institute’s community cancer center. The researchers analyzed data on 1,977 breast cancer patients between the ages of 40 and 49 who were treated between 1990 and 2008. The researchers looked at method of diagnosis (detected by mammography, patient or physician), stage at diagnosis (0-IV, confirmed by biopsy), treatment, and annual follow-up information, including recurrence of disease.

“Our goal was to assess the differences between mammography and non-mammography detected breast cancer, to determine whether earlier detection confers a treatment and morbidity advantage because the disease is found at an earlier stage,” Malmgren said.

The data analysis revealed a significant increase in the percentage of mammography-detected breast cancer over the 18-year period: from 28 percent in 1990 to 58 percent in 2008. Over the same period, patient- and physician-detected breast cancer declined from 73 percent of all cases in 1990 to 42 percent in 2008.

“The shift toward more mammography-detected breast cancer cases was accompanied by a shift toward diagnosis at an earlier stage of disease that required less treatment,” Malmgren said.

Over the 18-year period, the number of breast cancers diagnosed at Stage 0 increased by 66 percent, while the number of Stage III breast cancers decreased by 66 percent.  The majority of Stage 0 cancer cases were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive cancer that is confined to a milk duct. The treatment of DCIS remains controversial, because not all experts agree that it is potentially life threatening.

Malmgren said another key finding of the study was the extent of treatment patients received. Compared with women whose cancer was self-detected or discovered by a physician, patients whose cancer was detected using mammography were more likely to have breast-conserving treatment and less likely to have chemotherapy. Specifically, they were more likely to undergo lumpectomy (67 percent versus 48 percent), less likely to undergo modified radical mastectomy (25 percent versus 47 percent), and less likely to die of breast cancer (4 percent versus 11 percent).

“The benefits of breast cancer treatment are accompanied by significant harms,” Malmgren said. “Chemotherapy may have long-lasting toxic effects on a woman’s body, and mastectomy and reconstructive surgery are difficult and expensive operations that can have a significant effect on body image.”

For more information: radiology.rsna.org/

 

Related Content

Illinois Governor Approves State Breast Density Reporting Bill Into Law
News | Breast Density | August 13, 2018
Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner approved the Illinois Breast Density Reporting Law (Public Act 100-0749) on Aug. 10, 2018...
iCAD Receives FDA Clearance of PowerLook Density Assessment for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis
Technology | Breast Density | August 08, 2018
iCAD announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of its latest artificial intelligence (AI) software...
Konica Minolta Hosting Lunch and Learn at 23rd Annual Mammography Meeting in Santa Fe
News | Breast Imaging | July 31, 2018
Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will sponsor a lunch and learn featuring its Exa Mammo platform during the 23rd...
FDA Approves New Tomosynthesis Quality Control Tests for ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual
News | Mammography | July 30, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the American College of Radiology’s (ACR’s) amendment to...
computed tomography brain scan

Image courtesy of Pixabay

News | Clinical Trials | July 19, 2018
The use of computed tomography (CT) scans has increased dramatically over the last two decades. CT scans greatly...
Fujifilm to Host Pediatric Imaging Best Practices Symposium at AHRA 2018
News | Pediatric Imaging | July 18, 2018
Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. announced that it will offer educational opportunities and exhibit its latest...
CT Decision Instrument Reliably Guides Pediatric Blunt Trauma imaging Decisions

This is a four-site prospective observational cohort. Image courtesy of Kirsty Challen, B.Sc., MBCHB, MRES, Ph.D., Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, United Kingdom.

News | Clinical Decision Support | July 18, 2018
A new study finds The Pediatric NEXUS Head Computed Tomography (CT) Decision Instrument (DI) reliably identifies blunt...
Study Points to Need for Performance Standards for EHR Usability and Safety
News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | July 18, 2018
A novel new study provides compelling evidence that the design, development and implementation of electronic health...
Artificial Intelligence Provides Faster, Clearer MRI Scans

A new artificial-intelligence-based approach to image reconstruction, called AUTOMAP, yields higher quality images from less data, reducing radiation doses for CT and PET and shortening scan times for MRI. Shown here are MR images reconstructed from the same data with conventional approaches, at left, and AUTOMAP, at right. Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

News | Artificial Intelligence | July 17, 2018
A research team with funding from the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has...
Overlay Init