News | Artificial Intelligence | November 15, 2018

Life Image and Mendel.ai Bringing Artificial Intelligence to Clinical Trial Development

Partnership combines Life Image’s global network of imaging access inside physician workflow with Mendel’s deep learning AI to streamline oncology trial recruitment

Life Image and Mendel.ai Bringing Artificial Intelligence to Clinical Trial Development

November 15, 2018 — Life Image and Mendel.ai announced a new strategic partnership that will facilitate the adoption and enhancement of artificial intelligence (AI) in site selection and patient recruitment for oncology trials. The partnership will employ Life Image’s global network for sharing clinical and imaging data and Mendel.ai’s novel AI platform built to aid oncology clinical research by rigorously examining every piece of electronic medical record (EMR) data.

This new engagement will advance the use of Mendel Brain, which helps life sciences and research facilities by analyzing clinical data at a site location to identify patient cohorts for a given protocol. Mendel Brain yields 30 to 50 percent more patients while decreasing the elapsed time between patient eligibility and identification to minutes compared to conventional pre-screening practices, which can take months or even years. It can also proactively identify potential trials for patients by comparing their EMR data to a trial database curated from over 40,000 sources.

Mendel Brain will be offered as a component of the Life Image Interoperability Suite to deliver additional value to its large network of research hospitals, helping reduce the administrative burdens of clinical trial participation. In addition, the ease of interoperability and integration available through Life Image will help accelerate the adoption and application of Mendel Brain while providing greater access to clinical data including imaging data to help increase accuracy in patient selection.

This new partnership follows Life Image’s recent re-launch announcement, which included the release of its new Interoperability Suite. Life Image’s interoperable solution, which integrates into existing workflows, orchestrates the flow of more than 10 million clinical encounters per month, connecting 1,500 U.S. facilities, 8,000 affiliated sites, 150,000 U.S. providers and 58,000 global clinics with a broader ecosystem of patients, life sciences, medical device companies and telehealth companies.

Life Image and Mendel will be attending the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Annual Meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

For more information: www.lifeimage.com, www.mendel.ai

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