Technology | Breast Biopsy Systems | October 03, 2018

Leica Biosystems Launches MammoPort Specimen Containment and Transport System

First integrated specimen containment and transport system standardizes tissue transfer from radiology to pathology to ensure quality and reduce errors

Leica Biosystems Launches MammoPort Specimen Containment and Transport System

October 3, 2018 — Leica Biosystems announced the U.S. launch of MammoPort, the first integrated specimen containment and transport system for breast tissue biopsies.

"Mammoport is the only tissue containment system which unites pathology and radiology colleagues in their common desire for maintaining tissue integrity throughout the entire radiological tissue acquisition to the pathologic diagnostic process," said Darius R. Gilvydis, M.D., breast imaging specialist at Edward-Elmhurst Health.

With medical errors representing a leading cause of death, experts recommend developing consensus protocols that streamline the delivery of medicine and reduce variability to improve quality and lower costs in healthcare. By integrating MammoPort with the Mammotome revolve breast biopsy device, the tissue containment and transport system is standardized, minimizing the potential for error and tissue damage.

Current breast biopsy methods require over 300 different processing steps and 14 interdepartmental handoffs, resulting in an increased chance for tissue damage, according to Heather Renko-Breed, global product manager at Leica Biosystems. MammoPort eliminates the need for manual tissue handling by radiology technologists, protecting the quality of the biopsied tissue and enhancing ease of use.

"Mammoport is the first system to completely eliminate unnecessary tissue manipulation and calcification separation, therefore maintaining critically important tissue orientation, size and integrity," said Gilvydis. "This is performed without crush damage to the tissue from tweezers as with other systems. This maintenance of tissue integrity allows improved diagnostic accuracy, which can lead to improved patient treatment and outcomes."

The Mammotome revolve breast biopsy device automatically places the tissue into the tissue trays. The radiology technologist then inserts the tray with the samples into the Mammoport container, and it is transported to the radiograph. Once the calcifications are confirmed, the radiology technologist marks the container with the breast cores of interest, placing it into formalin for seamless transport to the pathology lab for grossing and processing.

MammoPort eliminates the need to manually separate tissue with calcifications from non-calcifications, helping prevent potential medical errors. The specimens remain individually contained to maintain the orientation and location of the calcifications, and the marked container helps to ensure the proper patient information and critical specimen identification of calcifications remain intact throughout the process.

"The hard work of detecting the breast abnormality, acquiring the tissue during the biopsy process, can all be undone by manual crush manipulation during the separation of tissue and calcifications," said Gilvydis. "Mammoport eliminates this pitfall and helps bridge tissue integrity throughout the acquisition and diagnostic process from radiology to pathology."

For more information: www.leicabiosystems.com

Related Content

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in (a). The bottom row focuses on the detection of small calcifications, a key feature in DCIS. These are undetectable in (d), detected in (e), enhanced in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image at the bottom of (f), and confirmed by histopathology in the top part of (f). The scale bar [shown in (b) and (e)] is the same for all images apart from (f), which has its own scale. Red arrows in (e) and (f) indicate the microcalcifications. Image courtesy of Professor Alessandro Olivo

News | Breast Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — A new X-ray imaging scanne
F-18 FES PET images of patients with ER+/PR+/HER2- invasive ductal carcinoma. Left panel: Progressive disease seen at the 8-week time-point in a patient on sequential therapy. Right panel: Stable disease through all 3 time-points, remaining on study therapy for 6.7 months until disease progression on combined vorinostat aromatase inhibitor therapy. Image created by Lanell M Peterson, Research Scientist, University of Washington Medical Oncology, Seattle WA.

F-18 FES PET images of patients with ER+/PR+/HER2- invasive ductal carcinoma. Left panel: Progressive disease seen at the 8-week time-point in a patient on sequential therapy. Right panel: Stable disease through all 3 time-points, remaining on study therapy for 6.7 months until disease progression on combined vorinostat aromatase inhibitor therapy. Image created by Lanell M Peterson, Research Scientist, University of Washington Medical Oncology, Seattle WA.

News | Molecular Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — Molecular imaging
A comparison of standard mammography imaging (left) in a woman with dense breasts and a breast MRI imaging study (right) showing a clearly defined cancer and is extremely hard to detect on the mammograms.

A comparison of standard mammography imaging (left) in a woman with dense breasts and a breast MRI imaging study (right) showing a clearly defined cancer and is extremely hard to detect on the mammograms. Images from Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

Feature | MRI Breast | February 17, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Dense breast tissue can hide cancers i
Screening strategy based on baseline breast density at age 40 may be effective and cost-effective for reducing breast cancer mortality

Getty Images

News | Breast Density | February 10, 2021
February 10, 2021 — A mammography screenin...
Comparison of breast cancer mortality rates (red squares) and distant-stage breast cancer incidence rates from SEER9 (blue dots) and SEER18 (green dots) per 100,000 for white women aged, A, 20–39, B, 40–69, and, C, 70–79 years (3,7,8).

Comparison of breast cancer mortality rates (red squares) and distant-stage breast cancer incidence rates from SEER9 (blue dots) and SEER18 (green dots) per 100,000 for white women aged, A, 20–39, B, 40–69, and, C, 70–79 years (3,7,8). Image courtesy of Radiology 

News | Breast Imaging | February 10, 2021
February 10, 2021 — Breast cancer death rates have stopped declining for women in the U.S.
After acquiring the molecular breast imaging (MBI) assets from GE Healthcare and Dilon Technologies, Inc., SmartBreast Corporation (SmartBreast), a privately held company focused on breast cancer screening and diagnosis, announced today that it has formed a partnership with FoxSemicon Integrated Technologies, Inc. (FITI) to manufacture molecular breast imaging (MBI) systems.
News | Breast Imaging | February 09, 2021
February 9, 2021 — After acquiring the...

Chart courtesy of the American Cancer Society

News | Breast Imaging | February 08, 2021
February 8, 2021 — Cancer ranks as a leading cause of death in every country in the world, and, for the first time,
Volpara Health, a health technology software company whose integrated breast care platform assists in the delivery of personalized patient care, announced the acquisition of CRA Health, LLC, a breast cancer risk assessment company spinoff from Massachusetts General Hospital — a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital.

Getty Images

News | Breast Imaging | February 02, 2021
February 2, 2021 — Volpara Health, a health technology software company whose integrated...
A nationwide panel of experts has developed the first mammography guidelines for older survivors of breast cancer, providing a framework for discussions between survivors and their physicians on the pros and cons of screening in survivors' later years.

Getty Images

News | Mammography | January 29, 2021
January 29, 2021 — A nationwide panel of experts has developed the first...