News | Enterprise Imaging | September 25, 2018

Laurel Bridge Enables Healthcare Providers to Manage Image Archive Migrations and Consolidations

Improved Exodus Migration and Consolidation Controller provides enterprises the flexibility and control to migrate legacy and other medical imaging data

Laurel Bridge Enables Healthcare Providers to Manage Image Archive Migrations and Consolidations

September 25, 2018 — Laurel Bridge Software announced improvements to their Exodus Migration and Consolidation Controller that enhance the ability of healthcare providers to internally manage their own medical image archive migration and consolidation requirements.

The latest updates to Exodus help ensure that clinician access to historical medical imaging information can be an integral part of any healthcare organization’s enterprise imaging strategy that may be implemented using either of the following approaches:

  • Self-managed through internal expertise; or
  • Service-provider-managed through Laurel Bridge.

The following new capabilities make it easy for organizations to bring the necessary migration and consolidation expertise in-house:

  • An easily configured graphical user interface;
  • Improved migration status monitoring tools;
  • Faster migrations by leveraging load balancing capabilities;
  • Improved performance, in particular for study-based queries; and
  • Support for a Source-of-Truth migration approach.

In addition, the Exodus - Migration and Consolidation Controller can work in concert with other Laurel Bridge software solutions, such as the Compass ‑ Routing Workflow Manager and Navigator ‑ Imaging Retrieval Workflow Manager to manage complex migrations and data orchestration requirements. This capability can be especially helpful for organizations that have recently merged or have been acquired.

Jeff Kelly, CIO at Nuvodia, a healthcare IT management services provider, stated, “Using Exodus to bring our migration expertise in-house has enabled us to improve customer delivery and reduce costs. We are able to put our customers at ease because of the flexibility and robustness of the Laurel Bridge solutions.”

For more information: www.laurelbridge.com

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