News | X-Ray | August 12, 2016

Kubtec Aids Research Collaboration for Forensic Anthropology Study of Fetal Skulls Using 3-D Imaging

August 10,  2016 Kubtec is helping with with an anthropologic imaging study of dried fetal skulls. The company recently welcomed Gerald Conlogue, MHS, RT (R)(CT)(MR), emeritus professor and co-director of the Bioanthropology Research Institute at Quinnipiac University, to its facility. Professor Conlogue, a radiographer renowned for his work in forensic and anthropologic imaging, used the Kubtec Parameter 3‑D Tomosynthesis System to capture images of a dried fetal skull from the Shapiro/Robinson Collection at the Cushing Center at Yale.  This unique collection features fetal skulls ranging from four to 40 weeks gestation.

In partnership with Kubtec, University College Dublin, Cranfield University (U.K.), UConn Dental School, Quinnipiac, and Yale, Conlogue will be capturing X-ray images of specimens of varying sizes and gestational stages from the collection with different imaging modalities. Along with the Parameter 3‑D Tomosynthesis System, this study will compare X-ray film in cassettes with intensifying screen, non-screen film, computed radiography (CR), direct digital radiography (DR), multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), dental cone beam computed tomography, and microCT.

The goal of this project is to identify the modality which delivers optimum imaging results for specimens of varying sizes by comparing cost and image resolution for each modality. The findings will benefit radiographers in technical terms, as well as researchers who will be able to accurately predict their costs when creating research budgets and applications.

During this visit, Professor Conlogue, along with two international students from University College Dublin, brought “Skull 4” from the collection, a skull from a fetus at 30-36 week gestation. Skull 4 is the largest skull in the collection and was examined using both the 2‑D and 3‑D modalities of the Kubtec Parameter 3‑D System.

The Parameter 3-D Tomosynthesis System from Kubtec is the only system capable of providing 2‑D images, as well as 3‑D slices of their specimen. Slice by millimeter slice, the Parameter 3‑D System enabled Professor Conlogue’s team to instantly view the finest anatomical detail in Skull 4. Designed for multiple applications, including science and research, forensics, and non-destructive testing (NDT), Parameter 3‑D is the only system to offer 3‑D tomosynthesis imaging for forensic and anthropological studies.

At Kubtec, we’re looking forward to conducting more X-ray examinations on several more of the fetal skulls from the Shapiro/Robinson Collection as a research partner in Professor Conlogue’s project. The results of this project will be on display in the rotunda of the Yale Medical School Library from May 2017 until April 2017.

For more information: www.kubtec.com

Related Content

Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants Rarely Interpret Diagnostic Imaging Studies
News | Radiology Business | September 18, 2019
September 18, 2019 — Although Medicare claims data confirm the...
FDA Clears GE Healthcare's Critical Care Suite Chest X-ray AI
Technology | X-Ray | September 12, 2019
GE Healthcare announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) 510(k) clearance of Critical Care Suite, a...
Richardson Healthcare Receives CE Mark Approval for ALTA750 Canon/Toshiba CT Replacement Tube
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 11, 2019
Richardson Healthcare, a Division of Richardson Electronics Ltd., announced it has received CE Mark approval for the...
OSF HealthCare Expands Portfolio of Carestream Imaging Solutions
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | September 04, 2019
OSF HealthCare in Peoria, Ill., recently added a new Carestream DRX-Evolution Plus System to its portfolio of...
A 3-D printed tungsten pre-clinical X-ray system collimator. 3D printed, additive manufacturing for medical imaging.

A 3-D printed tungsten pre-clinical X-ray system collimator. The tungsten alloy powder is printed into the form desired and is laser fused so it can be machined and finished. Previously, making collimators from Tungsten was labor intensive because it required working with sheets of the metal to create the collimator matrix. 

Feature | Medical 3-D Printing | September 04, 2019 | By Steve Jeffery
In ...
The Siemens Ysio Max digital radiography system.
Webinar | Digital Radiography (DR) | September 03, 2019
The Webinar "Benefits of Advanced Automation in X-ray" will be presented Wednesday, Sept. 25 at 1 p.m.
Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Installation of Mobilett Elara Max
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | August 28, 2019
UCHealth Greeley Hospital of Greeley, Colo., recently became the first healthcare facility in the United States to...
Improved Imaging Technique Could Increase Chances of Prostate Cancer Survival
News | Prostate Cancer | August 20, 2019
According to the American Cancer Society, approximately one in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their...
Videos | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019
Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional...
Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System
Technology | Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019
Shimadzu Medical Systems USA, a subsidiary of Shimadzu Corp., announced they have received U.S. Food and Drug...