News | Enterprise Imaging | November 14, 2018

Konica Minolta Announces New Tools in Exa Enterprise Imaging Platform

Tools including improved voice recognition, chat and peer review designed to increase clinical productivity and enhance communication

November 14, 2018 — Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will showcase new features and tools for the Exa Enterprise Imaging platform at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago. Exa is comprised of multiple modules, including a picture archiving and communication system (PACS), radiology information system (RIS), billing and specialty viewers, across a single, shared database that can be used individually or together for a complete enterprise imaging experience.

The new features include:

  • Exa Voice Recognition transforms the user interface of Exa transcription into a more customized and user-based reporting experience that allows each radiologist to report in their most efficient manner. The company said Exa Voice Recognition is truly zero footprint (ZFP), as there is nothing to install on workstations. Voice recognition and dialect detection used in the application have been dramatically improved to more accurately capture dictation and support more languages;
  • Exa Chat is an easy-to-use system that lets users communicate one-on-one or with entire departments. It allows radiologists to quickly and securely discuss and share patients, studies, approved reports and more. This helps improve communication within and between the outpatient imaging center and hospital radiology department, with the assurance that patient health information is being communicated in a secure manner;
  • Exa Peer Review is embedded into the radiologists' workflow to quickly share and reference specific patients, studies, approved reports and more. Exa Peer Review has customizable criteria including percentage of studies, total number of studies, relative value unit (RVU)-based or value-based on modality and/or exam and timeframe per criteria. Exa Peer Review is built into the Exa Platform, eliminating the need for managing third-party peer review systems;
  • Exa Patient Kiosk is a self-service tool that allows patients to easily check-in virtually or on-site for appointments, update demographic and insurance information, and complete and sign electronic forms. It is available online through the Patient Portal and on-site via tablets with touchscreen capabilities. This new feature will ease bottlenecks in the front office, decrease patient wait times and improve the overall registration process, leading to a better patient experience; and
  • An improved Study Form Template helps the department move to a paperless workflow with an easy-to-use form builder to create forms more quickly and easily than ever before in Exa. The user-friendly form builder interface delivers greater flexibility and customization options than previously available.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

 

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