News | Advanced Visualization | September 11, 2017

Intronix Technologies Developing Augmented Reality Medical Simulation for Neuromuscular Injection Procedures

Canadian company collaborating with Western University to create new simulation and training opportunities for medical education

Intronix Technologies Developing Augmented Reality Medical Simulation for Neuromuscular Injection Procedures

September 11, 2017 — Canadian-based Intronix Technologies will be working with Roy Eagleson, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Software Engineering at Western University, to develop new augmented reality medical simulations to support treatment delivery to patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

Medical professionals are expected to continuously acquire new knowledge and skills while treating their patients. Medical simulations offer clinicians the opportunity for hands-on experience without involving patients. Simulation provides a safe method for teaching necessary skills. Clinicians can carry out procedures, refine techniques and build confidence, without putting patients at risk. Integration of new technology, such as augmented reality, will now provide an opportunity to improve the depth and authenticity of the experience.

"Musculoskeletal disorders have a major impact on society in terms of morbidity, long-term disability and economics," said Evan Friedman, M.D., president of Intronix Technologies. "Patients require ongoing treatment, and to achieve that objective, we need medical personnel who are adept at handling the specialized processes involved."

Friedman explained that the new technology will create musculoskeletal medical simulations using anatomically accurate models of the body. These models can be palpated, having the look and feel of a live patient. Augmented reality will add the ability to view the underlying muscles, as the injection needle navigates through the tissue to its target. This new training aid will provide feedback beyond what is available using real patients.

Read the blog "Two Technologies That Offer A Paradigm Shift in Medicine at HIMSS 2017."

Watch the VIDEO "Editor's Choice of Most Innovative Technology at HIMSS 2017," which includes examples of augmented reality.

For more information: www.intronixtech.com

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Figure 4 for the study. Images of a 65-year-old man (patient 6). (a) Cardiac MRI perfusion shows perfusion deficit of anterior/anterolateral wall attributed to left anterior descending artery/left circumflex artery (*). (b) CT coronary angiography. (c) Coronary angiography, left anterior oblique projection with caudal angulation. (d) Three-dimensional image fusion helped refine diagnosis: perfusion deficits (*) were most likely caused by narrow first diagonal branch and its first, stented side branch (arrowhead). Retrospectively, denoted lesion could also be found at CT coronary angiography and coronary angiography (arrowheads in b and c, respectively). CT FFR = CT-derived fractional flow reserve, LGE = late gadolinium enhancement. Image courtesy of RSNA, Radiology.

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