News | Archive Cloud Storage | December 20, 2018

IMS Announces Integration of Cloud Image Viewing Platform With Google Cloud

IMS Cloud View users will now be able to connect directly to any Google Cloud account to access full fidelity medical images

IMS Announces Integration of Cloud Image Viewing Platform With Google Cloud

December 20, 2018 — International Medical Solutions (IMS) recently announced it will provide Google Cloud account users with the ability to upload, manage, distribute, view, annotate, save, download and delete their medical images in a secure environment. Similar to Google Drive, the IMS Cloud View will connect directly to any Google Cloud account and enable users to access full fidelity medical images with no installation required. The underlying U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared imaging technology also allows medical professionals to engage in interactive, web-based reviews, on any device using full fidelity DICOM images.

The IMS Web Viewer provides the secure distribution of full fidelity medical images and gives real-time access to multiple clinicians at the same time.

IMS will continue to build on the capabilities it offers on Google Cloud Platform. Looking ahead, the company plans to optimize the global reach of Google Cloud Platform and expand its current serverless viewing technology in parallel with its artificial intelligence and machine learning initiatives.

IMS provided a full functioning demonstration of its IMS Cloud View inside the Google Cloud booth at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

For more information: www.imstsvc.com

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