News | December 01, 2010

Historical Radiology Analysis can Save Millions in Osteoporosis Costs

December 2, 2010 – Analyzing historical images in radiology databases can save millions in osteoporosis costs, according to data presented at the 2010 RSNA meeting. Researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden used Sectra’s Digital X-ray Radiogrammetry (DXR) method to identify patients who subsequently suffered a hip fracture.

The study of 8,257 patients showed the bone mineral density (BMD) is lower in those who suffered from a hip fracture later on. The company’s DXR is an automated method for estimating the distal forearm cortical BMD from a standard X-ray. A hand X-ray image is taken and then sent to Sectra’s online lab for analysis.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the method for use as a medical device.

Osteoporosis is an under-diagnosed and under-treated disease. According to a report from the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, only 14 percent of patients with a fracture are treated for osteoporosis, while 60 to 70 percent are targeted for treatment.

Despite first fracture being a strong indicator of future osteoporotic fractures, only 10 to 20 percent of these patients are prescribed treatment. Convenient tools and systematic ways of working are key to the detection of the disease. Today, the majority of all radiology images are digital and there is thus huge potential to reduce future costs through a structured osteoporosis prevention program.

For more information: www.sectra.com

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