News | September 26, 2012

GE Healthcare Supplies Imaging for New Cancer Treatment Centers of America Facility

Cancer Treatment Centers of America GE Healthcare Atlanta

September 26, 2012—Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), a national network of hospitals focusing on complex and advanced-stage cancer, has opened its new Southeastern Regional Medical Center in the Atlanta, Ga. area. The new facility will be equipped with innovative GE Healthcare diagnostic imaging solutions, including wide bore magnetic resonance (MR) and low dose computed tomography (CT) solutions, as well as cardiac electrocardiography, anesthesia and vital signs monitoring technology.

GE Healthcare has an expanding portfolio of oncology solutions to address one of the leading causes of death across the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), deaths from cancer worldwide are projected to continue to rise to over 13.1 million in 2030. Cancer mortality can be reduced if cases are detected and treated early and about 30 percent of cancers are preventable through a healthy lifestyle and regular exercise.

Collaborating with leading healthcare providers like CTCA, GE is working toward a new frontier in cancer breakthroughs: imaging systems that help physicians not just find a tumor, but characterize each cell; molecular imaging agents that help target cancer like never before; molecular diagnostics that help physicians personalize cancer treatment and management decisions, enabling the right treatment for the right patient at the right time; and innovative technologies that help researchers increase their understanding of the causes and the progression of cancer.

GE’s commitment to tackling cancer involves $1 billion to advance oncology solutions over five years, a healthymagination pledge to help 10 million cancer patients around the world by 2020, and up to $100 million for a cancer-focused open innovation R&D challenge.

The new CTCA at Southeastern Regional Medical Center combines advanced clinical treatments and technology with an array of supportive therapies to improve quality of life. CTCA’s Empowerment Center also highlights CTCA’s commitment to collaboration with the cancer community and empowering patients with information and resources.

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