Webinar | Computed Tomography (CT)| May 30, 2019

WEBINAR: Myocardial CT Perfusion: A Comprehensive Appraisal of Patient Selection and Technique in a Multimodality Imaging Environment

Webinar Co-sponsored by SCCT and DAIC, supported by an educational grant from Canon Medical Systems USA


Chest pain is one of the most frequent reasons for an evaluation in the emergency room.There are multiple imaging modalities available to evaluate the patient with chest discomfort.This webinar aims at evaluating the role of myocardial CT perfusion testing in the patient with chest pain. The webinar will discuss patient selection, basic physiology, technique, test characteristics and case presentations at the end.

This webinar is co-sponsored by DAIC and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), and supported by an educational grant from Canon Medical Systems USA.

This is the first webinar in a two-part series. You can view the second webinar, Cardiovascular CT in pediatric patients: Technique and Applications With Emphasis on New Generation Scanners, can be viewed here.

Register for the on-demand version of this webinar

 

Learning objectives:

  • To select the appropriate patient for CT Perfusion
  • Understand the basic concepts/Physiology behind CT perfusion
  • Discuss various protocols for the acquisition of CTP
  • Understand the differences between static and dynamic CT perfusion
  • Understand test Characteristics of CTP

 

The outline of the presentation as follows:

  1. Introduction
  2. CT Perfusion Physiology
  3. CT perfusion basics/Patient preparation
  4. CT perfusion protocols for rest/stress
  5. CT perfusion image acquisition
  6. CT perfusion post processing
  7. CT perfusion case presentations

 

Speaker:

Ron Jacob, M.D., FACC, FASE, FSCCT, FSCMR, Director of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Lancaster General Hospital/PENN Medicine

Jacob is the director of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at Lancaster General Hospital/PENN Medicine. He has served on the International Outreach Committee of the Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) both as co-chair and most recently as chairman over the last two years. He has taught and helped to organize courses around the world focusing on the increasing the utilization of cardiac MRI and on the use of multimodality imaging in cardiovascular disease. Since he started in his current position, Lancaster General Hospital has participated in various research studies focusing on imaging, including the PROMISE study, RESCUE study, ACRIN PA 4008. He was invited faculty at the CT perfusion course conducted in Johns Hopkins and completed a pilot project using CT perfusion at Lancaster General Health/PENN Medicine. A new project evaluating the utility CT perfusion and CT-FFR is being started in 2019 at Lancaster General Health/PENN Medicine. 

 

Intended Audience:

This activity is intended for radiologists and cardiologists involved in CT Perfusion and CT Scanners.

 

Register for the on-demand version of this webinar

 

 

 

 

Related Content

Guerbet announced the launch of OptiProtect 3S, a new range of technical services for its injection solutions. OptiProtect 3S is designed to support imaging centers in the daily use and protection of their injection solutions.
News | Contrast Media Injectors | February 25, 2021
February 25, 2021 — Guerbet announced the launch of ...
Advanced technologies and applications such as point-of-care, pediatrics, dry-magnets, compact MRI and fusion imaging are driving global market
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Frost & Sullivan's recent analysis, Technological Advancements and Emerging Applications in t
55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned. #COVIDvaccine #COVID19

55-year-old woman who underwent screening mammogram and ultrasound 7 days after first COVID-19 vaccination dose. Screening mammogram and US demonstrated unilateral left axillary lymph node with cortical thickness of 5 mm on ultrasound (not shown). BI-RADS category 0 was assigned. Ultrasound from diagnostic work-up performed 7 days later showed no change in lymph node size. BI-RADS 3 was assigned.

News | Breast Imaging | February 24, 2021
Detroit-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology company SpinTech, Inc. has acquired medical-imaging research and technology developer Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. (MR Innovations).
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Detroit-based magnetic resonance...
Findings indicate that PPC and GG are highly predictive of overall upstaging by PSMA PET/CT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer

Image courtesy of UCLA Health

News | PET-CT | February 23, 2021
February 23, 2021 — A...
icobrain cva allows the quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion by reporting the volume of core and perfusion lesion by quantifying Tmax abnormality and CBF abnormality together with the mismatch volume and ratio
News | Artificial Intelligence | February 23, 2021
February 23, 2021 — icometrix, world leader in imaging...
Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in

Examples of the imaging performance of XPCI-CT (b,e) compared to conventional specimen radiography (a,d) and benchmarked against histopathology (c,f). he top row focuses on the similarity between the XPCI-CT slice in (b) and the histological slice in (c). Arrow 1 indicates margin involvement, arrow 2 a variation in density in the internal structure of the tumour mass, arrow 3 tumour-induced inflammation. All this is confirmed by the histological slice in (c), and hardly visible in the conventional image in (a). The bottom row focuses on the detection of small calcifications, a key feature in DCIS. These are undetectable in (d), detected in (e), enhanced in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image at the bottom of (f), and confirmed by histopathology in the top part of (f). The scale bar [shown in (b) and (e)] is the same for all images apart from (f), which has its own scale. Red arrows in (e) and (f) indicate the microcalcifications. Image courtesy of Professor Alessandro Olivo

News | Breast Imaging | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — A new X-ray imaging scanne
Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — According to an...