Technology | Ultrasound Women's Health | December 03, 2018

GE Healthcare Introduces Invenia ABUS 2.0

Updated automated breast ultrasound system features improved data acquisition, patient comfort enhancements

GE Healthcare Introduces Invenia ABUS 2.0

December 3, 2018 — GE Healthcare recently launched the Invenia automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) 2.0 system in the United States. This device is the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ultrasound supplemental breast screening technology, according to GE, specifically designed for detecting cancer in dense breast tissue. When used in addition to mammography, Invenia ABUS can improve breast cancer detection by 55 percent over mammography[1] alone.[2]

“We are committed to informing patients about breast density, and offering supplemental screening options,” said Sophia Roumanis, M.D., section head of breast imaging and intervention, Beaumont Breast Care Center, Dearborn, Mich. “We are thrilled to add this advanced ultrasound technology to our breast cancer screening program, which allows better visibility of dense breast tissue during breast cancer screenings.”

More than 40 percent of women in the U.S. have dense breast tissue[3], which is one of the strongest common risk factors for developing breast cancer. Breast density is a measurement of the amount of fatty tissue versus the amount of fibrous tissue in the breast. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white on a mammogram, so looking for tumors in women with dense breasts can be like looking for a snowball in a snowstorm. Because of this, tumors are often unseen – or “masked” – on mammography exams.

“Our goal is to find cancers as early as possible to offer the best potential outcome for the patient,” commented Vidya Pai, M.D., section head of breast imaging and intervention, Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Mich. “By offering this supplemental screening to mammography for patients with dense breast tissue, we anticipate improving detection for small cancers that may not be seen on a mammogram alone in these women.”

Launched in 2014, Invenia ABUS has been installed at hundreds of facilities around the world. The new Invenia ABUS 2.0 builds on its predecessor to enhance the exam experience for both operators and patients, including new features that further customize the exam based on the patient’s body:

  • Efficient exams: The cSound Imageformer, a software-based graphics processor, provides a reproducible and operator-independent acquisition method to achieve consistent, high-quality results. cSound imaging allows significantly more data to be collected and used to create every image. Traditional hand-held ultrasound parameters such as focal zones and gain are automatically optimized. No image manipulation is required, so that high image quality is consistent from operator to operator with the touch of a button; and
  • Improving the patient experience: The gentle shape of the Reverse Curve transducer follows the natural contour of the breast, providing patient comfort, thorough contact and helping ensure comprehensive coverage. The 15 cm large field-of-view transducer is easy to position and maintains even compression while scanning. Since no two women are identical, exams can be customized with programmable scan protocols, adjustable scan depths and compression levels. With the touch of a button, the operator can also shorten scan time once breast tissue acquisition is complete.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

 

References

[1] Increase in cancer detection associated with an overall decrease in false positives.

[2] Brem RF, Tabár L, et.al. Assessing Improvement in Detection of Breast Cancer with Three-dimensional Automated Breast US in Women with Dense Breast Tissue: The SomoInsight Study. Radiology. 2015 Mar; 274(3): 663-73.

[3] https://ww5.komen.org/Breastcancer/Highbreastdensityonmammogram.html

 

Related Content

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Typical CT imaging features for COVID-19. Unenhanced, thin-section axial images of the lungs in a 52-year-old man with a positive RT-PCR (A-D) show bilateral, multifocal rounded (asterisks) and peripheral GGO (arrows) with superimposed interlobular septal thickening and visible intralobular lines (“crazy-paving”). Routine screening CT for diagnosis or exclusion of COVID-19 is currently not recommended by most professional organizations or the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Image courtesy of RSNA

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 26, 2020
March 26, 2020 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2
News | Mammography | March 25, 2020
March 25, 2020 — The...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Representative examples of the attention heatmaps generated using Grad-CAM method for (a) COVID-19, (b) CAP, and (c) Non-Pneumonia. The heatmaps are standard Jet colormap and overlapped on the original image, the red color highlights the activation region associated with the predicted class. COVID-19 = coronavirus disease 2019, CAP = community acquired pneumonia. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020
March 20, 2020 — An arti...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Series CT scans in 35-year-old woman with COVID-19 pneumonia. (a) Scan obtained on illness days 1 showed multiple pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) mainly in right lower lobe. (b) Scan obtained on illness days 5 showed increased extent of GGO and early consolidation. (c) Scan obtained on illness days 11 showed multiple consolidation with almost the same extent. (d) Scan obtained on illness days 15 showed a mixed pattern with a slightly smaller extent, and the perilobular consolidation might suggest the presence of organizing pneumonia. The patient was discharged on illness days 17. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 20, 2020
March 20, 2020 — In a new study pub
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SBI20

Image courtesy of Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 17, 2020
March 17, 2020 — The journal Radiology ...
The 2020 Society of Breast Imaging/American College of Radiology (SBI/ACR) annual symposium has been cancelled, and the event rescheduled for April 8-11, 2020, in Savannah, Ga. #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SBI20
News | Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) | March 16, 2020
March 16, 2020 — The 2020 Society of Breast Imaging/American College of Radiology (...
The low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) scans used in lung cancer screening do not appear to damage human DNA

Immunofluorescent staining performed to depict γ-H2AX foci. Representative images of γ-H2AX foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes in an 82-year-old woman who underwent standard-dose CT. (a) Nuclear DNA of four lymphocytes. (b) γ-H2AX foci (arrows). (c) Markers of DNA double-strand breaks. In this merged image, DNA is blue and γ-H2AX foci are red (arrows show small foci). γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, is a phosphorylated type of histone H2AX. Scale bar: 5 mm. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Lung Cancer | March 11, 2020
March 11, 2020 — The low-dose chest computed tomog...
DBT, sometimes called 3-D mammography, emerged in the last decade as a powerful tool for breast cancer screening

Images in a 57-year-old woman noted to have "good prognosis" invasive cancer detected at digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) screening. (a) Craniocaudal view of the left breast obtained with the two-dimensional digital mammography (DM) portion of the DM/DBT screening study demonstrates a subtle area of distortion in the medial left breast. (b) Single-slice image from the left craniocaudal DBT portion of the screening study shows an area of bridging distortion (circle). (c) Electronically enlarged image of the area of concern seen on the left craniocaudal view in a single DBT slice as shown in b. (d) Targeted US scan demonstrates two small adjacent irregular solid masses. US-guided core biopsy yielded an invasive carcinoma of the tubular subtype that was estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative. The results of the sentinel node biopsy were negative. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Breast Imaging | March 11, 2020
March 11, 2020 — A new study published in the journal ...