News | Cardiac PACS | October 10, 2019

Fujifilm Upgrades Next-Generation Synapse Cardiology PACS

First-of-kind solution now in clinical use at North Memorial Health

Fujifilm Upgrades Next-Generation Synapse Cardiology PACS

October 9, 2019 – Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. recently launched Synapse Cardiology PACS 5.6.1, the company’s next-generation server-side rendering solution to help streamline image review and reporting across cardiovascular modalities. This technology is currently in clinical use at North Memorial Health, a Minneapolis-area health system and one of the nation’s top-rated hospitals for cardiovascular care.

Developed with ongoing direction from cardiologists, Synapse Cardiology PACS (picture archiving and communication system) is Fujifilm’s next-generation, secure server-side rendering technology for cardiology imaging and reporting. Leveraging the investment and advancements made with Synapse Radiology PACS, Fujifilm has applied its expertise to cardiology — bringing the company a step closer to a common PACS platform — a merge of cardiology and radiology imaging and reporting. The ultimate goal is to enhance image management and reporting across multiple modalities, allowing for a more complete patient record and thus, a more comprehensive care plan. 

North Memorial Health is a longstanding Fujifilm customer, with Synapse Radiology PACS and Synapse Mobility currently in clinical use, and a Synapse VNA (vendor neutral archive) install in the works. Fujifilm credits North Memorial Health with assisting in the development of the company’s Advanced Reporting component of Synapse Cardiology PACS, one of many reasons Fujifilm chose North Memorial Health as its pioneering site for clinical use of version 5.6.1. 

“North Memorial Health approaches improvements in care delivery with a spirit of inventiveness and creative problem solving. We’re the first hospital in Minnesota to receive full Heart Failure Accreditation from the American College of Cardiology for excellence in the care and management of heart failure. We are also the first and only hospital in Minnesota to earn Chest Pain Center and Primary PCI accreditation,” said Osama A. Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, interventional cardiologist, North Memorial Heart & Vascular Center. “It is fitting that North Memorial Health is the initial partner to work with Fujifilm to use the new version of Synapse Cardiology PACS, and this partnership and investment exemplifies how we’re continuing to blaze new trails to bring better cardiac care to all patients.”   

North Memorial Health’s Synapse Cardiology PACS version 5.6.1 upgrade is being conducted in phases. The health system transitioned its cardiac catheterization lab over from web-based to server-side, improving physician access to images as well as workflow speed and performance. Imaging and reporting from invasive peripheral and vascular modalities are now being actively sent to the facility’s electronic medical record (EMR), and North Memorial Health physicians are benefiting from the enhanced interpretation and workflows. 

For Fujifilm, transitioning its Radiology and Cardiology PACS solutions to server-side is a big step towards making the company’s PACS offering a fully artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled platform.

For more information: www.fujimed.com

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