News | Biopsy Systems | March 16, 2017

Exact Imaging Announces Health Canada Approval and License for ExactVu Micro-Ultrasound System

First Canadian customer will use prostate biopsy system in study to better understand apoptosis and how cancerous cells respond to therapy

Exact Imaging, Health Canada approval, ExactVu micro-ultrasound system, prostate biopsies, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Gregory Czarnota

March 16, 2017 — Exact Imaging has received Health Canada approval and the corresponding medical device license (#98667) to sell its ExactVu high resolution micro-ultrasound biopsy system in Canada. The first device was sold to Gregory Czarnota, M.D., and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto.

"The unmatched resolution of the ExactVu micro-ultrasound system will provide important capabilities to our urologists in helping them actually visualize and distinguish suspicious tissue — and therefore allows us to actually target our prostate biopsies," said Czarnota, director of the Odette Cancer Research Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute and Radiation Oncologist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. "Furthermore, the ExactVu's high resolution imaging also generates rich RF (or radiofrequency) data which our research teams can evaluate and correlate with pathology to apply against our models to better understand apoptosis and how cancerous cells respond to therapy. We see very exciting potential in the ExactVu system and look forward to our collaboration with the team at Exact Imaging."

Czarnota discovered that high-frequency ultrasound could be used to detect apoptosis or cell death. This finding has since been applied to important questions in oncology and organ transplantation. Czarnota's research group is investigating a number of spectroscopic parameters for characterizing tumors and tumor responses to chemotherapy and radiation therapy at high frequencies and intends to use the ExactVu for such purposes. Specific applications include developing methods to generate color-coded ultrasound parametric maps to aid in assessing tumor responses to therapy. Since these spectroscopic signals are potentially linked to nuclear structure and chromatin structure that differs between normal and neoplastic tissue, there is potential to develop our spectroscopic methods not only into a method to track tumor responses but a potentially important diagnostic tool.

For more information: www.exactimaging.com

Related Content

Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery.

Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery. Read the original article in Plos One.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 28, 2021
Outside of medicine, computer-generated virtual twins of real machines like cars or airplanes have been used in engin
Artificial intelligence-powered diagnostic tool spots asymptomatic prostate cancer in seconds

(L-R) Associate Professor Peter Brotchie (St Vincent's), Dr Ruwan Tennakoon (RMIT), Professor John Thangarajah (RMIT), Dr Mark Page (St Vincent's). Image courtesy of St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

News | Prostate Cancer | July 19, 2021
July 19, 2021 — Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed
According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), return to routine screening for BI-RADS 3 lesions on supplemental automated whole-breast US (ABUS) substantially reduces the recall rate, while being unlikely to result in adverse outcome

Normal right mediolateral oblique (A) and craniocarudal (B) view screening mammograms demonstrate density C breasts. Coronal (C), transverse (D), and reconstructed lateral (E) views from supplemental automatic breast ultrasound (ABUS) demonstrates 7 mm circumscribed slightly hypoechoic circumscribed lesion at 11 o’clock position in right breast. Lesion was classified as BI-RADS 3. Patient has undergone yearly mammograms for 4 years following the ABUS examination with no breast cancer diagnosis.

News | Breast Imaging | July 16, 2021
July 16, 2021 —...
ujifilm's robust medical systems portfolio includes a comprehensive product lineup covering CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, digital radiography, women’s health, ultrasound, systems integration, endoscopy and endosurgery, enterprise imaging, assisted reproductive technology, cell culture media, cell therapy development, In-Vitro diagnostics (IVD), and investigational drug development
News | Radiology Imaging | July 14, 2021
July 14, 2021 — Fujifilm announced the launch of the ...
In a mouse model study of MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening at MRI field strengths ranging from ­approximately 0 T (outside the magnetic field) to 4.7 T, the static magnetic field dampened the detected microbubble cavitation signal and decreased the BBB opening volum

In a mouse model study of MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening at MRI field strengths ranging from ­approximately 0 T (outside the magnetic field) to 4.7 T, the static magnetic field dampened the detected microbubble cavitation signal and decreased the BBB opening volume. Image courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 13, 2021
July 13, 2021 — ...
Most countries have not introduced nationwide prostate cancer screening, as current methods result in overdiagnoses and excessive and unnecessary biopsies. A new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, which is published in The New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that screening by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and targeted biopsies could potentially cut overdiagnoses by half.

Getty Images

News | Prostate Cancer | July 12, 2021
July 12, 2021 — Most countries have not introduced nationwide...
The study investigates targeted drug delivery by focused ultrasound for pancreatic cancer

Getty Images

News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | July 01, 2021
July 1, 2021 — The University of Oxford announced commencement of