Technology | November 05, 2012

Elekta Introduces Mosaiq Connectivity for its microSelectron Digital Brachytherapy Afterloader

Oct. 29, 2012 - At the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO, Boston, Mass.), Elekta announced that MOSAIQ Oncology Information System (OIS) v 2.50 now includes connectivity with Nucletron's microSelectron® Digital afterloader. This added connectivity allows the treatment record and chart information, in addition to dose and structure sets, to be part of the complete patient record – saving time, simplifying workflow and creating a paperless flow of brachytherapy practice information.

MOSAIQ-microSelectron Digital connectivity is the latest in Elekta's long history of providing interfaces with virtually any radiotherapy delivery device or treatment planning system.

MOSAIQ now integrates with Accuray CyberKnife system 
Recently, St. Anthony Hospital (Oklahoma City, Okla.) became the first center to use a MOSAIQ interface for its Accuray CyberKnife radiosurgery system. A MOSAIQ user for several years, St. Anthony officials had discussed the possibility of a MOSAIQ interface for CyberKnife with Accuray representatives.

"We are always trying to pursue opportunities to improve the communication capabilities of our interfaces," says Chad Crane, BSRT(T), St. Anthony Supervisor, Radiation Oncology. "Since MOSAIQ is our primary department EMR, to have that functionality added to it was something we wanted to participate in."

According to St. Anthony Lead Physicist, Cindy Parry, M.S., the MOSAIQ-CyberKnife interface presented an opportunity to streamline their radiosurgery process and to consolidate all patient information in a single location.

"To me, the greatest value is that the treatment is directly transferred to MOSAIQ through the interface," she adds. "In this way, the physician seeing a patient for follow up can readily note that a CyberKnife patient got his fractions done in x amount of time, or can see if this patient also had an HDR or linac treatment – all that information will be in the patient record for him to see at once."

Mevion proton delivery added to MOSAIQ connectivity portfolio
Elekta also reported in October that MOSAIQ now includes interconnectivity with Mevion Medical Systems' MEVION S250 proton therapy system.

"The integration of the MEVION S250 with MOSAIQ is another important step toward making proton therapy accessible to more patients," says Lionel G. Bouchet, Ph.D., Senior Director Product Management, Mevion Medical Systems.

More than 20 years of open-vendor connectivity
With a longstanding open-systems development philosophy, MOSAIQ includes interfaces to Elekta's portfolio of linear accelerators, Elekta's Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion, and a broad array of third-party delivery systems, including Varian's TrueBeam, Accuray's TomoTherapy system, and Siemens' Artiste and ONCOR systems, in addition to many other commercially available radiotherapy systems.

"With the latest additions to the MOSAIQ interface portfolio, Elekta maintains its ongoing commitment to develop seamless MOSAIQ connectivity for any treatment system or treatment planning system," says Todd Powell, Executive Vice President, Elekta Software. "We match this effort with our constant introduction of new and clinically useful MOSAIQ functionality that health care providers can harness to improve the patient experience."

More than 2,500 global customers count on Elekta software to help them provide the safest and most efficient treatments in the fight against cancer. From its multiple redundant safety features to industry-leading practice management capabilities, MOSAIQ is the tool of choice to manage cutting-edge treatment centers.

For more information: www.elekta.com

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