Technology | April 07, 2008

DR System Offers Small Footprint, Improved Functionality

The Kodak DirectView DR 3500 is a compact digital radiography system that works to deliver a small footprint, functionality and convenience required by hospitals, outpatient imaging centers and clinics that serve orthopedic specialists and other physicians.

The DR 3500 system reportedly provides more productivity-enhancing features to the DR 3000 platform, which it replaces. The company said these productivity gains could translate to a more efficient workflow that can help facilities handle larger patient volumes without adding staff.

New capabilities include optional preprogrammed auto-positioning, which allows technologists to position the equipment by pressing a single button. Its auto-collimator enhancements, including field size and filter, are preprogrammed for each projection. It has optional remote control adjust collimator settings and can activate preprogrammed positions. Patient positioning enhancements include a support bar for lateral chest exams and patient handles on the Bucky. A new control panel also displays additional information and is brighter and easier to read.

Like its predecessor, the compact DR 3500 system is motorized. It also has a floor-mounted stand that does not require wall mounts or ceiling suspension provisions. This creates greater placement flexibility and reduces the cost of installation. The single detector system can also be configured with a newly designed moveable table.

In addition to capturing upright and table exams, the Bucky’s tilting feature facilitates angled projections. Automatic positioning for upright and table projections and the constant alignment of the X-ray tube and detector can reportedly save time for radiographic technologists and patients.

The system can also be configured with a multifunctional, height-adjustable exam table with a four-way floating top that is designed for flexible patient positioning. The pedestal design can be freely positioned at any angle to the detector and supports 500 pounds.

Preview images are reportedly available in less than six seconds. The detector also features a large 17-by-17-inch image area that eliminates the need for rotation. The company said the system’s large cesium iodide detector matrix (3001 by 3001) with 143-micron pixels, combined with Carestream Health’s image processing software, produces sharp and detailed images.

April 2008

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