Technology | Teleradiology | January 11, 2017

Direct Radiology Launches Automation Intelligence Software to Enhance Workflow

New technology enhancements drive efficiency and ease radiology industry pain points

Direct Radiology, automation intelligence software, RSNA 2016

January 11, 2017 — Direct Radiology has launched automation intelligence software to enhance its teleradiology offering. The technology developments include Automated Query Retrieve, Monitoring and Automated Uptime, and Reverse DICOM Report Delivery.

These technology enhancements will streamline workflow, save the customer time and money, and increase turnaround times for Direct Radiology. Specifics include:

  • The Automated Query Retrieve software automatically looks through the on-site picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and pulls relevant prior exams and reports using a proprietary algorithm. This saves technologists time, as this had been a manual process, and improves the quality of Direct Radiology’s reports by allowing its radiologists to access prior exams more consistently and faster than before. For locations with an HL7 interface, the software can begin accessing archives and pulling prior exams even before the patient is seen in some cases;
  • Direct Radiology’s Reverse DICOM Report Delivery provides an optional, new and efficient, HIPAA-compliant method of electronic report delivery. If desired, Direct Radiology can send the completed reports directly back to the on-site PACS system. The report displays as a DICOM image alongside the study images in the PACS; and
  • The company has added Monitoring and Automated Uptime, which improves its report monitoring and delivery. This technology monitors the servers and provides Direct Radiology with a notification if there is a problem with the flow of cases or reports so they can fix it fast. The software communicates with the site server and monitors everything, including the HL7 sender and DICOM listener, automatically fixing any issue if it detects downtime. It regularly checks to make sure that the machine doesn’t have to repair itself on the fly.

Direct Radiology introduced these enhancements at the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 27-Dec. 1, 2016, in Chicago.

For more information: www.directradiology.com

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