News | March 25, 2015

Detectable PSA Post-Prostatectomy Necessitates More Aggressive Radiation Therapy, Study Says

Results indicate significant improvement in 10-year overall survival rates with further treatment

March 25, 2015 — Prostate cancer patients with detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy should receive earlier, more aggressive radiation therapy treatment, according to a new study.

The study — which was published in the February 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal) — is a 10-year post-treatment analysis of the German ARO 96-02 trial, a prospective clinical trial that compared a wait-and-see approach versus an adjuvant radiation therapy approach for patients with node negative prostate cancer who had a prostatectomy.

The Red Journal is the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

ARO 96-02 accrued 388 patients from 1997 to 2004 with pT3-4pN0 prostate cancer with positive or negative margins who had already undergone radical prostatectomy. Twenty-two centers in Germany participated in the trial. Three patients were excluded from the study because they received immediate hormonal treatment. Prior to reaching an undetectable PSA post-prostatectomy, 159 patients were randomized to a wait-and-see approach (Arm A) and 148 patients were randomized to receive adjuvant radiation therapy (Arm B). Seventy-eight patients who did not achieve an undetectable PSA were moved to Arm C. Four of the patients in Arm C refused treatment, and 74 patients were treated with salvage radiation therapy in Arm C.

All patients in the study had a pre- and post-operative PSA test, a bone scan and chest radiography. Patients in Arm B received 60 Gy of 3-D conformal radiation therapy. Patients in Arm C received 66 Gy of 3-D conformal radiation therapy. Follow-up was conducted for all eligible patients in the trial quarterly for the first two years, twice a year from three to six years post-treatment, and annually thereafter. The median follow-up time was 112 months (9.3 years).

Of the 74 patients in Arm C, 43 (58 percent) also underwent hormone therapy as a result of recurrence (at the discretion of the attending physician). Seven patients in Arm C, of the 48 who had data available, reached an undetectable PSA after completion of salvage radiation therapy. In Arms A and B, 20 patients (7 percent) experienced distant metastasis, and in Arm C, 12 patients (16 percent) experienced distant metastasis.

Patients with detectable PSA post-prostatectomy (Arm C) experienced limited side effects as a result of radiation therapy. Patients in Arm C did not report any grade 3 or grade 4 acute toxicities. Seven patients experienced severe late effects, with five patients (7 percent) reporting grade 3 bladder impairment, and two patients (3 percent) reporting grade 2 bladder impairment. Fifty patients (68 percent) in Arm C did not report any genitourinary late toxicity, and 59 patients (80 percent) in Arm C did not report any gastrointestinal late toxicity.

Clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. In Arm C, patients had a 10-year cRFS rate of 63 percent. Univariate analysis demonstrated that patients in Arm C who had a Gleason score <8 (p=.0023), pT<3b (p=.0076) or an extraprostatic tumor extension <2mm (p=.0047) had a better cRFS rate.

The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze overall survival (OS). Patients in Arm A had a 10-year OS rate of 86 percent, and patients in Arm B had a 10-year OS rate of 83 percent, compared with patients in Arm C who had a 10-year OS rate of 68 percent.

"After patients undergo radical prostatectomy, the marker for PSA should fall below detection limits. Our analysis demonstrates that patients who have detectable PSA post-prostatectomy may benefit from more aggressive, early and uniform treatment that could improve survival outcomes," said Thomas Wiegel, M.D., director of the radiation oncology department at University Hospital Ulm in Ulm, Germany, and lead author of the study. "The impact of PSA persistence on 10-year overall survival is evident based on this new analysis. Improved imaging or surrogate markers beyond PSA are desirable to distinguish risk groups among men with PSA persistence. Larger, prospectively randomized clinical trials should examine additional treatment options to come to a standardized therapy for prostate cancer patients with PSA persistence."

For more information: www.astro.org

Related Content

ASTRO and ASCO Launch New Cancer Care Quality Registry
News | Radiation Therapy | January 22, 2018
January 22, 2018 — A registry that tracks the quality of medical care provided to patients receiving cancer treatment
First Hospitals Achieve Inter-System Connectivity Across Accuray Radiation Therapy Platforms
News | Radiation Therapy | January 19, 2018
Accuray Inc. announced recently that the Heidelberg University Hospital in Heidelberg, Germany, and Oscar Lambret...
RayStation Selected for New Carbon Ion Therapy Center in Japan
News | Treatment Planning | January 18, 2018
January 18, 2018 – RayStation has been chosen as the treatment planning system for a new carbon-ion therapy facility
Raysearch Receives First Order for the Raycare Oncology Information System
News | Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | January 18, 2018
January 18, 2018 – Anderson Regional Cancer Center (ARCC) in Meridian, Mississippi, has placed the first order for...
Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Fat Distribution in Women and Men Provides Clues to Heart Attack Risk
News | Women's Health | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – It’s not the amount of fat in your body but where it is stored that may increase your risk for hea
Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Rates of Imaging Positivity for IV-SUDs Complications. Image courtesy of Efren J. Flores, M.D.

News | Clinical Study | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opio
Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

Lumbar spine MRI showing disc herniation and nerve root at baseline and one month after treatment

News | Interventional Radiology | January 11, 2018
The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back...
Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and the, C, D, first and, E, F, last examinations performed in contrast group patient 13. Regions of interest used in quantification of signal intensity are shown as dashed lines for globus pallidus (green), thalamus (blue), dentate nucleus (yellow), and pons (red).

News | Contrast Media | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive dec
Overlay Init