News | Mammography | November 20, 2020

Densitas Partners with Mammography Educators to Launch the First Telehealth Solution Powered by AI

Densitas Inc., a global provider of A.I. technologies for digital mammography and breast screening, announced its partnership with Mammography Educators to offer the first artificial intelligence powered telehealth technologist training platform to support business continuity in mammography facilities.

November 20, 2020 — Densitas Inc., a global provider of A.I. technologies for digital mammography and breast screening, announced its partnership with Mammography Educators to offer the first artificial intelligence powered telehealth technologist training platform to support business continuity in mammography facilities.

COVID-19 has amplified the need for telehealth solutions that deliver broader access to high quality mammography technologist training curriculum to mammography facilities facing resource constraints. Mammography Educators have partnered with Densitas to provide tailored educational content and a telehealth solution that provides live virtual training informed by densitas intelliMammo technologist report cards.

The densitas intelliMammo suite enables detection of trends in technologists' performance, providing quantitative image quality metrics at the technologist and mammography facility levels that enable mammography educators to develop an evidence-based curriculum that is customized for the needs of mammography practices.

"Achieving proper mammography positioning technique can be challenging but is critical for cancer detection. Positioning error rates can be addressed by standardization of technologists' techniques," said Louise Miller, R.T.(R)(M)(AART), CRT, FSBI, co-founder of Mammography Educators. "We are delighted to partner with Densitas® to provide fully-integrated educational materials available on-demand at point-of-care. We can now offer live training remotely, informed by Densitas generated technologist A.I. report cards."

densitas intelliMammo quickly identifies positioning errors and integrates Mammography Educators' training materials for easy access to technologists while the patient is still in the exam room, eliminating costly technical recalls and improving overall technologist performance.

This partnership provides a novel solution for technologist training. densitas intelliMammo produces quantitative image quality metrics to identify the positioning techniques that individual technologists find especially challenging. Evidence-based criteria are used to identify Mammography Educators' educational content to be presented at point-of-care for technologists, and enable Mammography Educators to develop a tailored educational curriculum delivered either remotely or in-person.

"The Densitas team is excited to partner with Mammography Educators, recognized leaders in radiological technologist training and globally renowned for their proven Miller Method for mammography positioning techniques" says Mo Abdolell, CEO of Densitas. "The pressures imposed by COVID-19 restrictions and the growing backlog of women awaiting rescheduling of their screening mammograms emphasizes the need for innovative solutions that ensure women continue to receive top quality mammography exams. Working with Louise Miller and Mammography Educators to offer an innovative A.I. powered evidence-based solution that enables development and remote delivery of a tailored educational curriculum is a game-changer. It throws the doors wide open to remote delivery of live training on a global scale to mammography facilities that would otherwise have no access to such high-quality training."

For more information: www.densitas.health

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