News | Ultrasound Imaging | September 12, 2016

Contrast Ultrasound Identifies Deadly Liver Cancers

Study results suggest contrast-enhanced ultrasound effective when MRI scans prove inconclusive for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

contrast-enhanced ultrasound, CEUS, liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, study, Advances in Contrast Ultrasound conference, ICUS

September 12, 2016 — Tiny microbubbles are being used to more effectively identify liver tumors, according to a study described at the 31st annual Advances in Contrast Ultrasound conference, Sept. 8-9 in Chicago.

Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, were found to benefit from contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was inconclusive, according to Stephanie Wilson, a professor of medicine at the University of Calgary in Canada and co-president of the International Contrast Ultrasound Society. She said that inconclusive MRIs occur frequently.

"This is an exciting option because hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, and standard imaging with MRI is often an insufficient option for characterizing the tumor," Wilson said.

CEUS uses liquid suspensions of tiny gas microbubbles to improve the clarity and reliability of an ultrasound image without exposing patients to ionizing radiation. The microbubbles are smaller than red blood cells and, when they are injected into a patient's arm vein, they improve the accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound exams. The microbubbles are expelled from the body within minutes.

David Cosgrove, emeritus professor at Imperial and Kings Colleges London, said the findings demonstrate the vast potential benefits of using microbubble ultrasound contrast agents as a safe, convenient and effective diagnostic imaging tool that improves patient care without exposing individuals to ionizing radiation. "CEUS is an excellent modality that can help differentiate benign from malignant tumors," he added.

"The findings are extremely exciting because this study appears to represent the first time ultrasound microbubbles have been used in patients for drug delivery," according to Steven Feinstein, M.D., co-president of ICUS and a professor of medicine at Rush University, Chicago.

For more information: www.icus-society.org

Related Content

According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the resources required to warm iohexol 350 to body temperature before injection for computed tomography (CT) may not be warranted, given the lack of observed practical benefit.

Values represent number of patients, with percentage in parentheses and 95% CI in brackets (not reported for levels of severity of allergic/allergic-like reactions). 95% CIs were calculated using the Clopper-Pearson exact formula. For events with zero frequency, one-sided 97.5% CIs are provided.

News | Contrast Media | July 30, 2021
Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery.

Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery. Read the original article in Plos One.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 28, 2021
Outside of medicine, computer-generated virtual twins of real machines like cars or airplanes have been used in engin
The FLASH Effect significantly improves the therapeutic ratio for curing cancer

The FLASH Effect significantly improves the therapeutic ratio for curing cancer

News | Radiation Oncology | July 28, 2021
July 28, 2021 — IntraOp Medical Corporation announced that ...
64-Year-Old Man With Clear Cell Likelihood Score (ccLS) 5 Renal Masses

64-Year-Old Man With Clear Cell Likelihood Score (ccLS) 5 Renal Masses. Coronal T2-weighted single shot fast spin echo and coronal T1-weighted fat-saturated spoiled gradient echo acquired during corticomedullary phase—ccLS5 lesion outlined red for clarity.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 22, 2021
Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (...
According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), return to routine screening for BI-RADS 3 lesions on supplemental automated whole-breast US (ABUS) substantially reduces the recall rate, while being unlikely to result in adverse outcome

Normal right mediolateral oblique (A) and craniocarudal (B) view screening mammograms demonstrate density C breasts. Coronal (C), transverse (D), and reconstructed lateral (E) views from supplemental automatic breast ultrasound (ABUS) demonstrates 7 mm circumscribed slightly hypoechoic circumscribed lesion at 11 o’clock position in right breast. Lesion was classified as BI-RADS 3. Patient has undergone yearly mammograms for 4 years following the ABUS examination with no breast cancer diagnosis.

News | Breast Imaging | July 16, 2021
July 16, 2021 —...
Ramon Alfredo Siochi, Ph.D. — the director of medical physics at WVU — led a task group to help ensure the accuracy of data that dictates a cancer patient's radiation therapy.

Ramon Alfredo Siochi, director of medical physics at West Virginia University. Image courtesy of WVU Photo/Aira Burkhart

News | Radiation Oncology | July 15, 2021
July 15, 2021 — Just as helicopter traffic reporters use their "bird's eye view" to route drivers around roadblocks s