News | Ultrasound Imaging | October 19, 2017

Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Safe and Effective Detector of Liver Cancer

Study of over 200 patients found CEUS achieve correct diagnosis with 97 percent accuracy, without radiation and at lower cost

Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Safe and Effective Detector of Liver Cancer

October 19, 2017 — Doctors can effectively detect liver cancer with ultrasound and tiny microbubbles, according to a study announced at the International Contrast Ultrasound Society (ICUS) 32nd Annual Conference, Oct. 5-6 in Chicago. This technique allows detection without radiation, expensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment or biopsies.

The imaging technique, known as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), "is an exciting option because it provides a more cost-effective and less-invasive way for accurately characterizing the tumor," said Stephanie Wilson, M.D., a professor of radiology at the University of Calgary and study author.

The study of over 200 patients at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common liver cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, found that CEUS imaging using the microbubbles allowed for the correct diagnosis with 97 percent accuracy.

CEUS uses liquid suspensions of tiny gas microbubbles to improve the clarity and reliability of an ultrasound image. The microbubbles are smaller than red blood cells and, when they are injected into a patient's arm vein, they flow through the microcirculation and reflect ultrasound signals, improving the accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound exams. The microbubbles are expelled from the body within minutes.

Steven Feinstein, M.D., a professor of medicine at Rush University in Chicago, said the study validates the vast benefits of using microbubble ultrasound contrast agents as a safe, convenient and effective diagnostic imaging tool. "The findings are extremely exciting and demonstrate that CEUS imaging improves patient care without exposing individuals to tissue diagnosis or ionizing radiation,” Feinstein added.

Wilson’s study utilized the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS), a tool radiologists use to classify liver tumors using computed tomography (CT), MR and CEUS imaging in patients with suspected liver cancer. Additional prospective studies are expected according to Yuko Kono, M.D., a professor of hepatology and gastroenterology at the University of California San Diego and a leader in the CEUS imaging field.

For more information: www.icus-society.org

Related Content

Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | December 14, 2018
Based on Mindray’s Living Technology, the Resona 7 (Sapphire), ZS3 (Diamond) and TE7 (Crystal) new ultrasound upgrades...
RSNA Study Shows Real-Time Indicator Improves Mammographic Compression
News | Mammography | December 12, 2018
Sigmascreening recently announced that more than 100,000 women have had mammography exams with the Sensitive Sigma...
Youth Football Changes Nerve Fibers in Brain

Statistically significant clusters (red-colored) showing group differences (Control vs. Football) in white matter strain along the primary (F1) and secondary (F2) fibers. While body of corpus callosum (BBC) showed relative shrinkage in Football group, the other clusters showed relative stretching of fibers. PCR: Posterior Corona Radiata, PLIC: Posterior Limb of Internal Capsule, SCR: Superior Corona Radiata, SLF: Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus, SCC: Splenium of Corpus Callosum. Image courtesy of Kim et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football...
Hitachi Medical Systems Europe Introduces Third-Generation Intelligent Vector Flow Mapping
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | December 07, 2018
Hitachi Medical Systems Europe introduced what it calls the next level of intelligent Vector Flow Mapping (iVFM) at...
YITU Releases AI-Based Cancer Screening Solutions at RSNA 2018
News | Artificial Intelligence | December 06, 2018
Chinese artificial intelligence (AI) healthcare company YITU healthcare released two brand-new products, Intelligent...
GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | December 05, 2018
GE Healthcare recently announced new applications and smart devices built on Edison – a platform that helps accelerate...
GE Healthcare Introduces Invenia ABUS 2.0
Technology | Ultrasound Women's Health | December 03, 2018
GE Healthcare recently launched the Invenia automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) 2.0 system in the United States. This...
Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
News | Women's Health | November 29, 2018
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring may lead to earlier impairment of cardiac function in women than in men,...
Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | November 28, 2018
This is an example of the new Fetal HQ heart and vascular software from GE Healthcare for fetal ultrasound.
Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRI

Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

News | Contrast Media | November 27, 2018
Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to reduce the dose of a contrast agent that may be left behind in...