News | Information Technology | September 10, 2020

Claritas HealthTech Launches Claritas iRAD

The Singapore HealthTech startup launches breakthrough radiology image enhancement cloud-based platform

Claritas iRAD Platform

Claritas iRAD Platform

September 10, 2020 — With a mission to empower radiologists and medical professionals by improving the image clarity for all types of radiology images, Singapore-based healthcare software company, Claritas HealthTech Pte Ltd, announced the launch of their proprietary software, Claritas iRAD.

Diagnostic errors in medicine are a longstanding problem and imaging plays a pivotal role in the diagnostic process for many patients. With estimates of average diagnostic error rates ranging from 3% to 5%, there are approximately 40 million diagnostic errors involving imaging annually worldwide. Moreover, in the face of COVID-19, digital transformation has been accelerated in many areas of healthcare, and the need for greater efficiency and responsiveness has become even more urgent. From identifying cases to determining the diagnosis at the very start of a patient’s journey, rapidly changing circumstances in healthcare today will inevitably place more demand on radiology departments.

“My son was suffering from recurring stomach pains, and after getting a CT scan just to rule out any issues, the first set of results suggested that he needed surgery. I was horrified and distressed but after a second round of tests and scans, it turned out the first scan was simply unclear, and to my huge relief there was absolutely no need for any surgery. It was just a misdiagnosis and the infection was easily treated with medication,” said Devika Dutt, Co-Founder and COO of Claritas HealthTech shared, as she personally resonated with the underlying issues of a misdiagnosis.

To overcome the shortcomings of the existing technology available, a team of imaging specialists, scientists and mathematicians at Claritas HealthTech, have developed Claritas iRAD and engineered an image enhancement process that preserves the finest details by individually enhancing each pixel to produce an image of high precision. Whether unclear due to radiation, low light or tissue absorption, the unique methods at Claritas HealthTech greatly improves clarity, without distorting, exaggerating or compromising the details of the original image.

Claritas iRAD can be seamlessly integrated into any of the existing radiology platforms, such as PACS (picture archiving and communications systems) viewer, to support better workflow. Additionally, as the platform is accessed through the cloud, Claritas HealthTech provides fast image processing at a user-friendly level, with no need for lengthy and complex training, even for first-time users.

Commenting as a third-party healthcare professional, Vas Metupalle, M.D., stated that, “In my 12 years as a healthcare entrepreneur in Asia, I find that Claritas HealthTech has an extremely unique proposition that supports doctors and radiologists in reducing missed diagnosis. It is a potential aggregator when it comes to the many AI tools in medical imaging that show better accuracy with the proprietary image enhancement solution from Claritas HealthTech, which results in improved patient outcomes and reduces further unnecessary tests for the patient”.

It goes without saying that the need to improve diagnostic performance to reduce potential patient harm is substantial. As patients are becoming increasingly aware of the benefits in radiology, and how it contributes to minimally invasive surgical procedures, Claritas iRAD aims to support medical professionals to better identify the nature of a patient’s illness. This will simultaneously ensure cost and time efficiency for patients on the account of re-testing, insurance and malpractice claims that often result from a misdiagnosis.

For more information on Claritas HealthTech, please visit www.claritasco.com.

 

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