News | January 27, 2009

Children's Hospital Offers New Therapy for Relapsed Neuroblastoma Patients

January 27, 2009 - Children’s Hospital Boston, MA, is offering a new therapy that uses radioiodine labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) to treat patients with relapsed neuroblastoma, marking the first time this therapy is being used in the New England region.

Neuroblastoma is a cancerous tumor that begins in nerve tissue of infants and very young children, and usually occurs in the abdomen but can occur in other sites near the spine and spread quickly to other areas of the body. It affects roughly 600 children a year in the U.S. and can have a varied clinical presentation – some cases are localized and easy to treat, while more than half of the children have aggressive disease that has spread at diagnosis and is much harder to cure.

Conventional treatments for neuroblastoma include surgery, local radiation and high-dose chemotherapy. “We are always looking for novel ideas and strategies to try to cure relapsed patients whose neuroblastoma is resistant to traditional treatments,” said Suzanne Shusterman, MD, attending physician at Children’s Hospital Boston and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute who oversees the neuroblastoma program. “I-131 MIBG is one of the most effective therapies for children with relapsed neuroblastoma, with a response rate of almost forty percent. While it doesn’t cure, I-131 MIBG can allow patients to gain control of their disease and, in combination with other treatments, bring them closer to being cured.”

Originally developed as a blood pressure medicine, MIBG is a compound that is selectively absorbed by certain types of nervous tissue, including neuroblastoma cells. For many years it has been used diagnostically to determine where cancerous activity is occurring within the body. More recently, oncologists began using it to deliver targeted radiation to neuroblastoma cells by binding it to a radioactive isotope of iodine (I-131). Once bound together, the radioactive MIBG is administered to a child through an intravenous line (IV) and absorbed by tumor cells, which are killed by the radiation emitted by the radioactive I-131. Children’s is the only center in New England, and just one of a handful in the United States, offering this advanced treatment.

“This treatment is a way of targeting radiation to kill tumors while sparing normal tissues,” said Lisa Diller, M.D., clinical director of Pediatric Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children’s Hospital Boston. “We are very excited that I-131 MIBG will be an important therapy in eradicating neuroblastoma.”

The actual infusion of I-131 MIBG is a short procedure, lasting approximately one to two hours. Because this treatment involves delivering high doses of radiation, a patient will stay in a specially designed room in the hospital for three to seven days after the infusion. The I-131 MIBG room is a 256 square-foot hospital room located in the stem cell transplant unit on the sixth floor of Children’s Hospital. The room has added protective features to help manage the therapy safely for the benefit of both patients and staff, and has an anteroom where parents may stay to help with the care of their child and be in close proximity throughout the therapy. During the day parents may safely spend time with their child following specific safety procedures designed to protect them as well as the hospital staff.

Compared to chemotherapy, I-131 MIBG is very well tolerated and affords a good quality of life for patients traditionally overwhelmed with hospital visits. The most common side effects are low platelets and low white blood cell counts about a month after receiving the treatment, both of which can be easily managed. Follow up visits to the hospital are also limited, most often taking place six to eight weeks after the date of infusion.

Almost all patients report at least a subjective response to I-131 MIBG. “The nice thing with I-131 MIBG is that most patients, even patients who don’t have a response that we can see by standard imaging techniques, have a decrease in their level of pain and improvement in their quality of life,” continued Shusterman.

S. Ted Treves, M.D., chief of the division of Nuclear Medicine at Children’s, commented, “The availability of this therapy demonstrates a true team effort and commitment from experts in multiple disciplines across the hospital – from pediatric oncology to nursing, child life, nuclear medicine and radiation safety.”

For more information: www.childrenshospital.org

Related Content

Researchers Trace Parkinson’s Damage in the Heart
News | PET Imaging | July 17, 2018
A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson’s researchers test new therapies and...
Siemens Healthineers Announces FDA Clearance of syngo.via VB30 Molecular Imaging Software
Technology | Nuclear Imaging | July 16, 2018
At the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), June 23-26 in Philadelphia...
Feature | Proton Therapy | July 03, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
The Alliance for Proton Therapy Access (APTA) released a national report in late May revealing the heavy emotional and...
SNMMI Image of the Year Highlights Theranostic Approach for Advanced Prostate Cancer

IMAGE OF THE YEAR: PSMA PET before and after lutetium-177 PSMA617 theranostics in 8 patients with metastatic prostate cancer who exhausted standard therapeutic options.

68Ga-PSMA11 PET maximum intensity projection (MIP) images at baseline and 3 months after 177Lu-PSMA617 in 8 patients with PSA decline ≥ 98 percent in a prospective phase II study. Any disease with SUV over 3 is in red. Credit: Michael Hofman, John Violet, Shahneen Sandhu, Justin Ferdinandus, Amir Iravani, Grace Kong, Aravind Ravi Kumar, Tim Akhurst, Sue Ping Thang, Price Jackson, Mark Scalzo, Scott Williams and Rodney Hicks, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

News | PET Imaging | June 29, 2018
In the battle against metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, studies have demonstrated a high response rate to...
MILabs Introduces Futuristic PET Capabilities on New VECTor6 System
Technology | PET Imaging | June 28, 2018
At the 2018 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) annual meeting, June 23-26, in Philadelphia,...
Philips North America and GE Healthcare Win IMV PET Imaging ServiceTrak Awards
News | PET Imaging | June 25, 2018
IMV, part of the Science and Medicine Group and a market research and business intelligence provider to the imaging...
New ASNC SPECT Imaging Guideline Addresses Advances in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
News | SPECT Imaging | June 21, 2018
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has published an update to its 2010 guidelines for single photon...
FDA Clears New Imaging Functionalities for Biograph mCT PET/CT Systems
Technology | PET-CT | June 21, 2018
Siemens Healthineers will announce U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of four new system features for...
PET/CT Changes Care for 59 Percent of Suspected Recurrent Prostate Cancer Cases
News | Prostate Cancer | June 13, 2018
A recently presented investigational clinical trial evaluated the impact of 18F fluciclovine positron emission...
Overlay Init