News | June 10, 2014

Chemo-radionuclide Therapy Halts Neuroendocrine Cancer

Combined chemo and radionuclide therapy with radiosensitizing drugs slows or stops disease progression and leads to better patient survival

June 10, 2014 — Advanced cancer of the neuroendocrine system can lead to dismal prognoses, but a novel therapy is packing a punch by uniting powerful radionuclide treatment and chemotherapy drugs, revealed researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2014 Annual Meeting.

The research findings show that the experimental therapy led to stabilization or regression of patients’ cancer in about 70 percent of cases a year after completion of the treatment, now called peptide receptor chemo-radionuclide therapy (PRCRT). The therapy is just catching on across Europe and Australia and now in U.S. clinical trials. 

“Results of this study suggest that PRCRT is a highly effective treatment option for patients with progressive NETs with high somatostatin receptor expression,” explained Grace Kong, MBBS, principal investigator for this study conducted at the Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia.

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are those that develop within a multiplicity of organs throughout the body that have nerve cells and interact with the endocrine system through chemical signaling made possible with various hormones. These tumors usually develop along the intestines and lungs, but they can also be found in the pancreas and many other sites, although rarely. For this study, researchers observed patients who had undergone at least three courses of treatment with Lutetium-177 DOTA-Octreotate, which is prescribed for inoperable patients with NETs expressing somatostatin hormone receptors. This study included a high proportion of grade two disease, which is more aggressive and associated with adverse prognosis. Researchers added a radio-sensitizing chemotherapy for 63 out of the 68 patients in the study.

All of these steps together produced encouraging responses in a majority of subjects, with 72 percent survival at two years. More than half of patients were still alive past the five-year mark after therapy.

“The high objective response and long median survival even in patients with more aggressive tumor biology warrant further studies comparing it with other targeted therapies recently approved, despite much lower response rates,” Kong added.

For more information: www.snmmi.org

Related Content

First GammaTile Therapy Case Completed in Arizona
News | Radiation Therapy | August 19, 2019
HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center is the first hospital in Arizona to begin offering GammaTile Therapy, a...
Drug Accelerates Blood System's Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy

Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications

News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019
A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem...
Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality

Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD

News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019
Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton...
First Patient Enrolled in World's Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial
News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019
Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive...
Efficacy of Isoray's Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies
News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019
August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica
MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center

The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec.

News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a...
Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems
News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019
Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated...
IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas
News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019
IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution...
The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.

The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. 

Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr