News | May 31, 2007

Cedara Software Releases C4 Platform to Enable Rapid Plug-In of Clinical Application Modules Into Single Workstation

June 1, 2007 — Cedara Software, a Merge Healthcare company, has released its C4 platform, an integration framework that enables modular integration of clinical applications with minimal impact on the host software product. A C4 enabled host and clinical application provide an integrated desktop with procedure-centric workflow.

The C4 platform supports integration with many imaging companies' picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), Radiology Information Systems (RIS) and Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems. The term C4 enabled refers both to the C4 host and to the clinical application that runs on the PACS, such as a 3D angiography visualization tool or a planning package for orthopaedic procedures.

C4 provides a standard interface for all bi-directional information between the C4 enabled host and clinical application module, creating a tightly integrated solution that is designed to maximize productivity.

According to Cedara Software president, Loris Sartor, C4 ushers in a dramatically improved potential to deliver new clinical functionality to radiologists and clinical specialists.

"Doctors are increasingly demanding more clinical functionality in imaging equipment, but for many imaging companies, developing these capabilities in-house can be challenging and costly," he said.

"Similarly, outsourcing is not an optimal alternative, because it presents difficulties in managing multiple integration efforts throughout the lifespan of each product. Cedara is offering imaging companies a standard interface that can be used for all C4 enabled clinical applications. We predict that many PACS, RIS and EMR companies will view this as an opportunity to serve their clinical customers."

C4 enabled clinical applications under development at Cedara include:

∑ I-ReadMammo(TM)*, for breast imaging
∑ OrthoWorks ProPlanner(TM), for orthopaedic planning and follow-up
∑ PET/CT* for advanced radiology procedures
∑ Cedara B-CAD*, to assist in breast ultrasound analysis.

New third-party clinical packages from Biotronics3D also are under development for 3D virtual colonoscopy, 3D angiography and 3D general diagnostic.

Software vendors wishing to develop highly specialized clinical application plug-ins can rely on the C4 software development kit (SDK) to provide them with a base set of necessary components and utilities to quickly build and verify the interface into the C4 framework. Built on decades of imaging development experience, the SDK provides a common interface for software vendors, enabling them to focus on their core competencies -- the clinical application rather than the interface.

Another significant benefit of the interface is that clinical applications that were not written for the Web environment can take advantage of the C4 Web services to become Web-enabled. Once the application module is ready and tested within the C4 framework, it is ready for implementation through any C4 enabled host with virtually no incremental development effort.

*Note: C4 enabled I-ReadMammo(TM), C4 enabled PET/CT and C4 enabled B-CAD are works-in-progress.

For more information visit: www.cedara.com

Related Content

DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
Videos | Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a new endoscopic virtual peritoneal inflation tool on the patient's computed tomography (CT) im
Videos | Orthopedic Imaging | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a 3-D printed pelvis that had multiple hip fractures and a second printed pelvis is from a post
Videos | Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019
This is an example of a new endoscopic 3-D imaging simulator created from a patient's computed tomography (CT) scan u
Patients and surgeons at Hoag Memorial Hospital are looking at virtual reality reconstructions (right) over conventional 2D images

Slice v 3D: Patients and surgeons at Hoag Memorial Hospital are looking at virtual reality reconstructions (right) over conventional 2D images. Images courtesy of Hoag Memorial Hospital

News | Radiology Imaging | March 04, 2019 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
 
iSchemaView Launches RAPID Angio
Technology | Angiography | March 01, 2019
iSchemaView announced the release of RAPID Angio, a complete neuroimaging solution for the angiography suite that...
Videos | Cardiac Imaging | February 27, 2019
This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient unveiled by Siemens at th
Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field.

Philips and Microsoft have partnered to develop an augmented reality system to help imporve workflow and procedural navigation in the cath lab. Physicians wearing visors can view and interact with true 3-D holograms above the patient on the table and manipulate the image with voice and hand motion commands to avoid breaking the sterile field. 

News | Advanced Visualization | February 25, 2019
Philips will unveil a new mixed reality concept developed together with Microsoft that the company says is designed for...
MRI and Computer Modeling Reveals How Wrist Bones Move

Using fast MRI, UC Davis researchers scanned left and right wrists of men and women and used the data to build computer models of the movement of wrist bones. The data could help understand wrist injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Image courtesy of Brent Foster and Abhijit Chaudhari, UC Davis.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 19, 2019
In a just-published Journal of Biomechanics article, the researchers proved a longtime assumption about individuals'...