News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 27, 2020

Carestream Increasing Production of Mobile Imaging Systems During Pandemic

In response to the need for critical care during the COVID-19 crisis, Carestream Health has increased production of its portable diagnostic imaging systems. As unlikely facilities begin to function as urgent care units, Carestream’s DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System and DRX-Revolution Nano Mobile X-ray System bring the X-ray exam to the patient’s bedside, delivering high-quality digital radiography images to healthcare providers in real time to aid in patient diagnosis—whenever and wherever needed

April 27, 2020 — In response to the need for critical care during the COVID-19 crisis, Carestream Health has increased production of its portable diagnostic imaging systems. As unlikely facilities begin to function as urgent care units, Carestream’s DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System and DRX-Revolution Nano Mobile X-ray System bring the X-ray exam to the patient’s bedside, delivering high-quality digital radiography images to healthcare providers in real time to aid in patient diagnosis—whenever and wherever needed.

“Our manufacturing plants and warehouses are operating at full capacity with employees putting in long hours and extra days to support the healthcare professionals who are on the front line of this exhausting fight,” said Charlie Hicks, Carestream’s General Manager for Premium Tier Solutions. “Likewise, Carestream suppliers and partners are ramping up production to help support this humanitarian crisis.”

With the current physical distancing measures in place, Carestream’s mobile solutions play an instrumental role in limiting the spread of infection by providing bedside chest imaging, which is vital for patients afflicted with the coronavirus, a disease that often results in a respiratory tract infection.

The DRX-Revolution system has added features to help reduce contamination. Shelves located in each of the detector slots, within the bin, allow users to safely place protective bags on detectors. Flush-mounted displays limit fluid ingress and provide a smooth surface for easier disinfecting. Bar code scanners automatically input patient information when wristbands are scanned, allowing users to quickly start an exam with limited interaction between the patient and the equipment.

Carestream’s nonmotorized DRX-Revolution Nano Mobile X-ray System also provides chest and intensive care imaging, with a compact, lower-cost mobile unit and an ultra-lightweight design for easy maneuverability and arm positioning.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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