News | Computed Tomography (CT) | November 29, 2015

Carestream Cone Beam CT Technology Examined in RSNA Case Studies

UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine investigating technology to acquire weight-bearing 3-D images of extremity injuries

Carestream, cone beam computed tomography, CBCT, RSNA 2015, clinical studies, UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine

Image courtesy of Carestream Health

November 29, 2015 — Specialists from UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine are  investigating Carestream’s cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to capture images of patients with orthopedic conditions as part of ongoing clinical studies. The CBCT system will be on display at Carestream’s booth at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) conference, Nov. 29-Dec. 3 in Chicago. The CBCT system used in these studies is investigational and not available for commercial sale.

UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine and Carestream are conducting an institutional IRB-approved clinical study designed to help orthopedic surgeons more accurately and objectively diagnose the degree of instability of the patella (knee cap). Two of the challenges of this condition are identifying the cause of patella dislocation and then calculating the amount of correction that would be necessary when tibial tubercle transfer surgery is planned.

“We compare images obtained on a conventional CT scanner to those obtained on the prototype CBCT scanner while the patient is standing, the quadriceps is active and the knee is flexed to 30 degrees,” said John Marzo, M.D., a physician with UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, associate professor of clinical orthopedics, School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo and former medical director, Buffalo Bills.

“The orthopedic specialists involved in the clinical study are extremely satisfied with image quality from the CBCT scanner and have provided positive feedback on the benefits provided by the use of this technology for weight-bearing exams,” he added.

Another research project is attempting to validate computational measures of joint surface area of contact and joint surface pressure using weight-bearing images from the cone beam CT scanner.

These clinical studies and other research projects will help guide Carestream’s development of new CBCT systems with the goal of providing orthopedic solutions for hospitals, clinics and sports medicine providers that use less radiation than traditional CT; are compact and affordable; and could be used in a wide range of facilities.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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