Technology | February 04, 2009

Calgary's Web-Based Platform Integrates Easily

February 4, 2009 - Calgary Scientific Inc. launched the multi patent-pending PureWeb Platform, a medical application platform designed to enable both Calgary Scientific’s ResolutionMD products and third-party applications to be delivered over the web.

These applications are delivered with full functionality over a simple web browser (including Internet Explorer, Safari or Firefox) without any client downloads. Combined with the power of PureWeb, the ResolutionMD product line delivers powerful advanced visualization tools and sophisticated diagnostic imaging clinical modules.

The PureWeb platform has the unique capability to rapidly integrate and virtualize third-party software applications. True virtualization of medical images and sophisticated clinical modules along with the core capabilities of the PureWeb Platform can uniquely harmonize multiple medical technologies from diverse vendors onto one standardized, high-performance platform.

All of these capabilities are available via a simple web browser. This capability offers the medical enterprise unheard of flexibility, through vendor cooperation, to create a customized, best-of-breed, enterprise-wide solution that is available anytime, anywhere to any approved user.

Calgary Scientific says PureWeb Platform does not sacrifice the speed or functionality of an existing product. There is no data duplication and there are few limitations to enable third-party applications for delivery over the web, making traditional thin-client solutions obsolete. PureWeb is designed to decrease costs by offering one unified system with a centralized architecture, eliminating the need to manage workstation hardware and operating system compatibilities, and extending the lifecycle of hardware, as the browser-based client capability is both low-impact and universal. The PureWeb Platform can also support Software as a Service models, removing the requirement for initial capital investment by end-users.

For more information: www.calgaryscientific.com

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