Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Blog | Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director | Radiology Imaging| March 06, 2018

On the Horizon for the Medical Imaging Market

The global medical imaging devices market is expected to generate revenue of $46.65 billion by 2023

The global medical imaging devices market is expected to generate revenue of $46.65 billion by 2023, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.47 percent during the forecast period, according to the newly released study “Medical Imaging Market — Global Outlook and Forecast 2018-2023” from Research and Markets. The market research report provides in-depth market and segmental analysis of the global medical imaging market by product, distribution channel, material and geography.

According to the report, the growth is being propelled by “an increasing focus on building advanced healthcare infrastructures and expanding access to modern medical technology.” The past recent years have seen the emergence and development of technologies such as 7.0T MRI last October, multi- and thin-slice computed tomography (CT) scanners, 4-D and 5-D ultrasound imaging, and innovations in digital X-ray technologies, all of which are likely to help boost the demand for medical imaging devices in the global market. In addition, many vendors are launching next-generation medical imaging devices that help in prevention, diagnosis and treatment planning, and disease management, which undoubtedly will help elevate this growing market share.

Currently the X-ray equipment product segment held the largest market share in the global medical imaging market, occupying close to 34 percent of the market size in 2017. This is divided into three major categories: analog X-ray, digital radiography and computed radiography. “The growing adoption of mobile X-ray systems and portable X-ray devices in the emergency department, operating rooms, ICUs and NICUs will drive the growth of the market segment during the forecast period. Portable X-ray systems offer consistent system availability, improved ease-of-use and versatility, and help reduce risks in healthcare monitoring and management,” stated the report.

 

Augmented Content

As technology emerges, so do the opportunities offered to you by ITN. We are continuing to augment its print coverage in this issue, starting with the front cover, featuring breast tomosynthesis technology. Newly FDA-cleared features are highlighted by hovering over the cover through your Blippar viewfinder. You can also find enhanced content in Pediatric MRI Calming Techniques on page 20, and on page 24 in the RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise Imaging. We have some other exciting advancements planned for future issues as well.

 

ITN is a Neal Awards Finalist

Also, I’m proud to announce that for the third year in a row, ITN is a finalist in the prestigious Neal Awards editorial excellence competition in the category “Best Range of Work by a Single Author,” which features a series of show videos created by Editor Dave Fornell. Now in its 64th year, the Neal Awards recognize the best in business-to-business editorial across standalone and integrated media channels. Dubbed “the Pulitzer Prize of business media,” the Neal Awards are b-to-b’s most prestigious and sought-after editorial honors. Winners of all categories will be announced in early April.

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