Technology | Advanced Visualization | October 05, 2016

Blackford Analysis Introduces Smart Localizer for Radiologic Imaging Comparison

Software allows cross-modality imaging comparison by automating volume registration of current and prior imaging studies in Philips PACS

Blackford Analysis, Smart Localizer, radiologic imaging comparison software, PACS, SIIM, RSNA 2016

October 5, 2016 — Blackford Analysis officially launched its Smart Localizer product at the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting, June 29-July 1 in Washington, D.C. The solution will also be displayed at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 27-Dec. 2 in Chicago.

Designed for users of Philips picture archiving and communications systems (PACS), including Philips iSite 3.6 and IntelliSpace 4.4 PACS, the Blackford Smart Localizer facilitates radiologic comparison of imaging findings across magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) studies. The software achieves this by automating volume registration of current and prior imaging studies before the radiologist reads.

Blackford initially revealed details of Smart Localizer in late 2014, and the company conducted final developments and testing in the run-up to SIIM. The software is designed to overcome the differences that typically exist between comparison studies performed on different modalities and by different vendors.

The Blackford Smart Localizer can increase radiologist productivity by 10-20 percent per study when reading comparison studies. For particularly challenging exams, like lung nodule comparisons, the productivity increase may reach 50 percent. This leads to improved clinical confidence, customer service and reading capacity, ultimately resulting in both improved quality of care and incremental revenue.

For more information: www.blackfordanalysis.com

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