News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 05, 2019

BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method

Novel technique enables simultaneous production of molybdenum-99 and other isotopes without the need for highly enriched, weapons-grade uranium

BGN Technologies Introduces Novel Medical Imaging Radioisotope Production Method

June 5, 2019 – BGN Technologies, the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University (BGU), introduced a novel method for producing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine and medical imaging technologies such as computed tomography (CT) scan and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT).

Developed by Alexander Tsechanski, Ph.D., from the BGU Department of Nuclear Engineering, the new technique obviates the need for highly enriched, weapons-grade uranium and a nuclear reactor. Nuclear medicine often necessitates the use of technetium-99m (Tc-99m) as the isotope for imaging, an unstable technetium isotope with a only a six-hour half-life that requires onsite production. In order to produce it in an economically efficient way, currently it requires weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium and a nuclear reactor to generate molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), which decays into technetium-99m (Tc-99m).

The new invention uses the naturally occurring and stable molybdenum-100 (Mo-100) isotope and a linear electron accelerator to generate Mo-99 and Tc-99m1. This process can also simultaneously generate other short-lived radioisotopes such as F-18, O-15, N-13 and C-11 as byproducts for use in PET scans.

BGN Technologies said it is currently looking for partners for further developing and commercializing the technology.

For more information: www.in.bgu.ac.il

Related Radiopharmaceuticals Content

Shine Medical Technologies Breaks Ground on U.S. Medical Isotope Production Facility

University of Missouri Research Reactor Files to Start U.S. Production of Medical Isotopes

FDA Clears Path for First Domestic Supply of Tc-99m Isotope

Reference

1. Fedorchenkoa D.V. and Tsechanski A. Photoneutronic aspects of the molybdenum-99 production by means of electron linear accelerators. Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research B, published online Oct. 23, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nimb.2018.10.018

Related Content

a) Includes scintigraphy and PET with and without concomitant CT. b) Includes conventional radiography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, fluoroscopy, and radiography performed during radiologic interventions. c) Includes general, cardiothoracic, maxillary, plastic, and orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. d) Includes allergology, cardiology, geriatrics, general internal medicine, pulmonology, gastroenterology, and rheumatology

a) Includes scintigraphy and PET with and without concomitant CT. b) Includes conventional radiography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, fluoroscopy, and radiography performed during radiologic interventions. c) Includes general, cardiothoracic, maxillary, plastic, and orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. d) Includes allergology, cardiology, geriatrics, general internal medicine, pulmonology, gastroenterology, and rheumatology. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Radiology Imaging | August 14, 2020
August 14, 2020 — According to ARRS' ...
It covers every major modality, including breast imaging/mammography, fixed and portable C-arms (cath, IR/angio, hybrid, OR), CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, radiographic fluoroscopy, ultrasound and X-ray
News | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2020
July 29, 2020 — IMV Medical Information, part of Scien...
In I-131 cancer therapy, decay events damage sensitive DNA within a tumor cell nucleus, causing catastrophic single and double strand breaks. Clinical use of antibody-delivered Auger emitters could open a window for the targeted destruction of extracellular COVID-19 virions, decreasing the viral load during active infection and potentially easing the disease burden for a patient. View all figures from this study.  http://jnm.snmjournals.org/content/early/2020/07/16/jnumed.120.249748.full.pdf+html

In I-131 cancer therapy, decay events damage sensitive DNA within a tumor cell nucleus, causing catastrophic single and double strand breaks. Clinical use of antibody-delivered Auger emitters could open a window for the targeted destruction of extracellular COVID-19 virions, decreasing the viral load during active infection and potentially easing the disease burden for a patient. View all figures from this study.

 

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 22, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
July 22, 2020 — One of the first studies has been published that looks at the use of...
Tau (blue) and amyloid (orange) distribution patterns for super-agers, normal-agers and MCI patients, when compared to a group of younger, healthy, cognitively normal, amyloid-negative individuals. Brain projections are depicted at an uncorrected significance level of p < .0001. Color bars represent the respective t-statistic. Image courtesy of Merle C. Hoenig, Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine II - Molecular Organization of the Brain, Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany, and Department of Nucle

Tau (blue) and amyloid (orange) distribution patterns for super-agers, normal-agers and MCI patients, when compared to a group of younger, healthy, cognitively normal, amyloid-negative individuals. Brain projections are depicted at an uncorrected significance level of p < .0001. Color bars represent the respective t-statistic. Image courtesy of Merle C. Hoenig, Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine II - Molecular Organization of the Brain, Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany, and Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

News | PET Imaging | July 16, 2020
July 16, 2020 — Super-agers, or individuals whose cognitive skills are above the norm even at an advanced age, have b
PSMA PET/CT accurately detects recurrent prostate cancer in 67-year-old man. 18F-DCFPyL-PSMA PET/CT shows extensive, intensely PSMA-avid local recurrence in prostate (bottom row; solid arrow) in keeping with the known tumor recurrence in the prostate. Right: PET shows extensive, intensely PSMA-avid local recurrence in prostate (top row; solid arrow) and a solitary bone metastasis in left rib 2 (bottom row; dotted arrow). Image courtesy of Ur Metser, et al.

PSMA PET/CT accurately detects recurrent prostate cancer in 67-year-old man. 18F-DCFPyL-PSMA PET/CT shows extensive, intensely PSMA-avid local recurrence in prostate (bottom row; solid arrow) in keeping with the known tumor recurrence in the prostate. Right: PET shows extensive, intensely PSMA-avid local recurrence in prostate (top row; solid arrow) and a solitary bone metastasis in left rib 2 (bottom row; dotted arrow). Image courtesy of Ur Metser, et al.

News | PET-CT | July 16, 2020
July 16, 2020 — New research confirms the high impact of...
Total-body dynamic 18F-FDG PET imaging with the uEXPLORER scanner allows us to monitor the spatiotemporal distribution of glucose concentration in metastatic tumors in the entire body (a). As compared to a typical clinical standardized uptake value image (b), the parametric image of FDG influx rate (Ki) can achieve higher lesion-to-background (e.g., the liver) contrast. In addition to glucose metabolism imaging by Ki, total-body dynamic PET also enables multiparametric characterization of tumors and organs

Total-body dynamic 18F-FDG PET imaging with the uEXPLORER scanner allows us to monitor the spatiotemporal distribution of glucose concentration in metastatic tumors in the entire body (a). As compared to a typical clinical standardized uptake value image (b), the parametric image of FDG influx rate (Ki) can achieve higher lesion-to-background (e.g., the liver) contrast. In addition to glucose metabolism imaging by Ki, total-body dynamic PET also enables multiparametric characterization of tumors and organs using additional physiologically important parameters, for example, glucose transport rate K1 (d), across the entire body. Image courtesy of G.B. Wang, M. Parikh, L. Nardo, et al., University of California Davis, Calif.

News | PET Imaging | July 16, 2020
July 16, 2020 — Results from the first...
Representative maximum-intensity projection PET images of a healthy human volunteer injected with 64Cu-NOTA-EB-RGD at 1, 8, and 24 hours after injection. Axial MRI and PET slices of glioblastoma patient injected with 64Cu-NOTA-EB-RGD at different time points after injection. Image courtesy of Jingjing Zhang et al., Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China/ Xiaoyuan Chen et al., Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, NIBIB/NIH, Bethesda, USA

Representative maximum-intensity projection PET images of a healthy human volunteer injected with 64Cu-NOTA-EB-RGD at 1, 8, and 24 hours after injection. Axial MRI and PET slices of glioblastoma patient injected with 64Cu-NOTA-EB-RGD at different time points after injection. Image courtesy of Jingjing Zhang et al., Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China/ Xiaoyuan Chen et al., Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, NIBIB/NIH, Bethesda, USA

News | PET Imaging | July 15, 2020
July 15, 2020 — A first-in-human study presented at the Society of...
PET/CT imaging showing uptake and retention of 86Y-NM600 (imaging agent) in immunocompetent mice bearing prostate tumors. PET imaging data was employed to estimate tumor dosimetry and prescribe an immunomodulatory 90Y-NM600 (therapy agent) injected activity. Image courtesy of R Hernandez et al., University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI.

PET/CT imaging showing uptake and retention of 86Y-NM600 (imaging agent) in immunocompetent mice bearing prostate tumors. PET imaging data was employed to estimate tumor dosimetry and prescribe an immunomodulatory 90Y-NM600 (therapy agent) injected activity. Image courtesy of R Hernandez et al., University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI.

News | PET-CT | July 15, 2020
July 15, 2020 — ...