News | Radiology Imaging | September 18, 2017

ASRT Foundation and Toshiba Medical Announce 2017 Safety First Grant Recipients

Healthcare facilities plan to purchase protective aprons, shields
and safety equipment to create a safer work environment for radiologic technologists

September 18, 2017 — Mary Washington Hospital and Union Health-Union Hospital will both receive Safety FiRsT grants to implement safety initiatives that will elevate radiologic technologist safety in the workplace. Launched in 2015 by the American Society for Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Foundation and Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc., the Safety FiRsT program awards two ASRT members per year a grant of up to $7,000 each to improve radiologic technologist safety in their departments.

This year’s recipients are:

  • Ericka Lasley, R.T.(R), who applied on behalf of Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, Va. The grant will be used to purchase lightweight and lead-free aprons that provide 20 percent more protection than standard lead-based equivalents. The new aprons will provide a more ergonomically correct fit as well as help to alleviate neck, shoulder, and back fatigue and pain due to their lighter weight. The hospital will conduct in-service training on the new lead-free alternative and improved protection to ensure proper use, care and storage of the aprons. They are purchasing a range of apron sizes to accommodate all members of the staff; and
  • Meghan Whittaker, R.T.(R), who applied on behalf of Union Health-Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Ind. The grant will be used to purchase a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safe cart. The cart will raise and lower for proper positioning of the patient and proper ergonomics for the technologist, thus reducing employee injuries during patient transfer and positioning. The grant will also facilitate in-service training on proper cart-to-table transfers, wheelchair-to-bed transfers and gait-belt transfers, as well as the purchase of Safety Essentials continuing education modules for radiologic technologist staff members. In addition, the organization’s fitness center employees will speak to team members about the importance of core strength in relation to patient transfers and also help employees increase their core strength.

As program manager for the School of Radiologic Technology at Mary Washington Hospital, Lasley said she remembers having to wear lead aprons all morning while working in a fluoroscopy room or attending long cases in the OR.

“By the end of the day, the shoulder, neck, back and leg pain could be just miserable,” she recalled. “I am extremely excited to provide our technologists with new, lightweight, ergonomically-correct, lead-free aprons.”

Whittaker, imaging services clinical educator at Union Health-Union Hospital, said it was her technologists who actually came up with the idea of purchasing an MRI safe cart and requested additional training on transferring patients.

“The technologists are very excited and really looking forward to this,” she said. “We’re very patient-centered and safety-centered here, so it just fits right in with our goal of reducing injuries and keeping technologists safe.”

Now in its third year, the Safety FiRsT program is helping healthcare facilities to create safer work environments for radiologic technologists. In 2016, Christine Bak, R.T.(R)(T), of Hartford Hospital in Connecticut, was awarded a grant to purchase and install an overhead lifting device to assist in raising patients from a prone or supine position. Additionally, Jennifer Maquez, R.T.(R)(MR), of Boca Raton Hospital in Florida, received a grant to purchase walkers and wheelchairs made of non-magnetic materials for safety in an MR suite.

The ASRT Foundation and Toshiba Medical Safety FiRsT grants are funded by a grant from Toshiba Medical.

For more information: www.asrt.org

Related Content

Kaplan-Meier curves for all-cause mortality in patients with versus without myocardial injury (Panel A) and in patients with versus without myocardial injury according to the presence or absence of major echocardiographic abnormalities (Panel B). *Includes wall motion abnormalities, global left ventricular dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, right ventricular dysfunction and presence of pericardial effusion. Event rates are censored at 20 days from hospital admission. Images courtesy of Mount Sinai Health S

Kaplan-Meier curves for all-cause mortality in patients with versus without myocardial injury (Panel A) and in patients with versus without myocardial injury according to the presence or absence of major echocardiographic abnormalities (Panel B). *Includes wall motion abnormalities, global left ventricular dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, right ventricular dysfunction and presence of pericardial effusion. Event rates are censored at 20 days from hospital admission. Images courtesy of Mount Sinai Health System

News | Ultrasound Imaging | October 28, 2020
October 28, 2020 — Card...
Ceiling-mounted X-ray system includes MyExam Companion intelligent user interface to guide technologist through exam workflow
News | X-Ray | October 26, 2020
October 26, 2020 — Siemens Healthineers has announced the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of the...
This illustration show the complexity of the data obtained from one single patient with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Different imaging approaches and techniques have their own unique sensitivity in assessing different aspects of neuroanatomy and neuropathology. What can be seen on images also changes with time since injury. Data from comprehensive clinical and functional assessments using a range of other tools is also important for evaluating patient outcome. Through data harmonization and large

This illustration show the complexity of the data obtained from one single patient with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Different imaging approaches and techniques have their own unique sensitivity in assessing different aspects of neuroanatomy and neuropathology. What can be seen on images also changes with time since injury. Data from comprehensive clinical and functional assessments using a range of other tools is also important for evaluating patient outcome. Through data harmonization and large-scale analyses of data combined across multiple research sites, the ENIGMA Brain Injury will develop and test methods and procedures for making sense of the complexity in this data. Images courtesy of Olsen et al., Brain Imaging and Behavior, 2020

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 23, 2020
October 23, 2020 — Trau...
A, Initial conventional axial CT image shows no noticeable lung damage (within red box) in right upper lobe. B, Electron density spectral CT image obtained at same time as image in A shows lesions (within red box) in right upper lobe. C, Follow-up conventional axial chest CT image obtained 5 days after images in A and B confirm presence of lesions (within red box) in right upper lobe.

A, Initial conventional axial CT image shows no noticeable lung damage (within red box) in right upper lobe. B, Electron density spectral CT image obtained at same time as image in A shows lesions (within red box) in right upper lobe. C, Follow-up conventional axial chest CT image obtained 5 days after images in A and B confirm presence of lesions (within red box) in right upper lobe. Image courtesy of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 22, 2020
October 22, 2020 — According to an open-...
The fMRI hyperscanning environment.

(A) The fMRI hyperscanning environment. The clinician (1) and patient (2) were positioned in two different 3T MRI scanners. An audio-video link enabled online communication between the two scanners (3), and video images were used to extract frame-by-frame facial expression metrics. During simultaneous acquisition of blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD)–fMRI data, the clinician used a button box (4) to apply electroacupuncture (EA) treatment (real/sham, double-blind) to the patient (5) to alleviate evoked pressure pain to the leg (6; Hokanson cuff inflation). Pain and affect related to the treatment were rated after each trial. (B) Study overview. After an initial behavioral visit, each individual participated in a Clinical-Interaction (hyperscan preceded by a clinical intake) and No-Interaction condition (hyperscan without a preceding intake), in a counterbalanced order, with two different partners. (C) Experimental protocol. Each hyperscan was composed of 12 repeated trials (four verum EA, four sham EA, and four no treatment) in a pseudo-randomized order. After a resting period (far left), both participants were shown a visual cue to indicate whether the next pain stimulus would be treated (green frame) or not treated (red frame) by the clinician. These cues prompted clinicians prepare to either apply or not apply treatment while evoking corresponding anticipation for the patient. Following the anticipation cue, moderately painful pressure pain was applied to the patient’s left leg, while the clinician applied or did not apply treatment, respectively. After another resting period, participants rated pain (patients), vicarious pain (clinicians), and affect (both) using a visual analog scale (VAS).

News | Clinical Trials | October 22, 2020
October 22, 2020 — The potential impact of the patient-clinician relationship on a patient's response to treatment is
On Oct. 21, Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, tweeted that CMS will delay the Radiation Oncology Model’s launch from Jan. 1 to July 1 

Getty Images

News | ASTRO | October 22, 2020
October 22, 2020 — In response to the Oct.
Lesion was originally reported as indeterminate enhancing mass, and outside report recommended biopsy. Classic features of benign hemangioma are shown. Error was attributed to faulty reasoning. A, Axial MR image obtained 5 minutes after contrast agent administration shows peripheral nodular discontinuous enhancement. B, Axial MR image obtained 10 minutes after contrast agent administration shows centripetal progression of enhancement (arrow). C, Axial fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA)

Lesion was originally reported as indeterminate enhancing mass, and outside report recommended biopsy. Classic features of benign hemangioma are shown. Error was attributed to faulty reasoning. A, Axial MR image obtained 5 minutes after contrast agent administration shows peripheral nodular discontinuous enhancement. B, Axial MR image obtained 10 minutes after contrast agent administration shows centripetal progression of enhancement (arrow). C, Axial fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MR image shows lesion is homogeneously hyperintense compared with liver parenchyma. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 21, 2020
October 21, 2020 — According to an artic...
According to an inquest, a man with a heart disorder and chest pain died two days after a doctor viewed the wrong scan and sent him home
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 21, 2020
October 21, 2020 — The BBC News
Flowchart of patient inclusion and exclusion.

Figure 1. Flowchart of patient inclusion and exclusion.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 20, 2020
October 20, 2020 — A new multi-institutional study published in the journal ...
Rensselaer, First-Imaging, and GE Global researchers develop a deep neural network to perform nearly as well as more complex dual-energy CT imaging technology
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 20, 2020
October 20, 2020 — Bioimaging technologies are the eyes that allow doctors to see inside the body in order to diagnos