Technology | September 30, 2010

Angiography Software Helps Navigate Structural Heart Cases

September 30, 2010 – New angiography navigation tools for structural heart cases were shown by GE Healthcare during last week's Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2010 symposium. Innova Vision Technologies for structural heart builds on proven image quality and dose efficiency to provide cardiologists the ability to navigate with confidence during complex structural heart procedures.

The new application effectively fuses real-time 2-D X-ray images and 3-D cardiac models from multiple modalities such as vascular X-ray, computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) and incorporates image stabilization features to reduce image motion that occurs with patient movement or breathing.

With the increasing adult congenital heart disease population that numbers more than 1 million in the United States, the volume of structural heart disease interventions has nearly doubled over the last eight years . About 50,000 aortic valve replacement procedures are performed annually in the United States. As cardiologists perform more complex procedures, the 3-D anatomy of the heart is essential to plan or guide these procedures. The 3-D anatomy of the aortic root can be obtained either from cardiac CT or from Innova 3-D Cardiac rotational angiography right within the cath lab. Multimodality in-room 3-D capabilities enable the navigation of 3-D and CT volumes at tableside using a dedicated in-room 3-D mouse. It also enables the bidirectional synchronization between the 3-D/CT/MR volume and the Innova gantry to choose optimal working views.

Built upon Innova’s 3-D imaging platform and the Advantage Workstation VolumeShare multimodality, visualization and navigation workstation, Innova Vision technologies provides 3-D/CT/MR image overlay on fluoroscopy. GE’s dedicated Innova Vision technologies provides uncompromised registration of the 3-D overlay on the 2-D fluoroscopy for structural heart procedures. The application is enhanced by image stabilization features such as electrocardiogram (ECG) gated display and motion tracking. These tools help reduce image motion that occurs with patient movement or breathing. It is available on GE’s Innova 2100IQ cardiovascular X-ray system along with the complete family of single-plane Innova systems.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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