Feature | X-Ray | November 03, 2015

World’s First Mini Particle Accelerator for High-brilliance X-rays Launched in Germany

New state-of-the-art compact X-ray source allows more precise control of X-rays for preclinical research

TUM, world's first mini synchrotron, X-ray source, Technical University of Munich

The new mini synchrotron "Munich Compact Light Source" (MCLS) is located in Garching at the Technical University of Munich Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM). Image courtesy of K. Achterhold/TUM.

November 3, 2015 — The world’s first mini synchrotron was inaugurated Oct. 29 at Technical University of Munich (TUM). It can generate high-brilliance X-rays on a footprint measuring just 5 x 3 meters. The new unit will be used chiefly to research biomedical questions relating to cancer, osteoporosis, pulmonary diseases and arteriosclerosis.

For some years now it has been possible to generate high-brilliance X-rays using ring-shaped particle accelerators (synchrotron sources). However, such installations are several hundred meters in diameter and cost billions of euros. Scientists and physicians are still routinely using X-rays for diagnostic purposes 120 years after their discovery. A major aim has therefore been to improve the quality of X-rays in order to make diagnoses more accurate. For example, soft tissues could thereby be visualized better and even minute tumors detected. For a considerable time, a team at TUM, headed by Prof. Franz Pfeiffer, Ph.D., chair of biomedical physics, has been developing new X-ray techniques.

The new mini-synchrotron, Munich Compact Light Source (MuCLS), is part of the new Center for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA), a joint project between TUM and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU).

The California-based company Lyncean Technologies, which developed the mini synchrotron, employed a special technique. Large ring accelerators generate X-rays by deflecting high-energy electrons with magnets. They obtain high energies by means of extreme acceleration, and this requires big ring systems.

The new synchrotron uses a technique where X-rays are generated when laser light collides with high-speed electrons – within a space that’s half as thin as a human hair. The major advantage of this approach is that the electrons can be traveling much more slowly. Consequently, they can be stored in a ring accelerator less than 5 meters in circumference, whereas synchrotrons need a circumference of nearly 1,000 meters.

“We used to have to reserve time slots on the large synchrotrons long in advance if we wanted to run an experiment. Now we can work with a system in our own laboratory - which will speed up our research work considerably,” said Pfeiffer.

Apart from being more compact, the new system has other advantages over conventional X-ray tubes. The X-rays it produces are extremely bright and intense. Moreover, the energy of the X-rays can be precisely controlled so that they can be used, for example, for examining different tissue types. They also provide much better spatial resolution, as the source of the beam is less diffuse thanks to the small collision space.

“Brilliant X-rays can distinguish materials better, meaning that we will be able to detect much smaller tumors in tissue in the future. However, our research activities also include measuring bone properties in osteoporosis and determining altered sizes of pulmonary alveoli in diverse lung diseases,” explained Klaus Achterhold, Ph.D., from the MuCLS team.

The scientists will initially use the instrument mainly for preclinical research, i.e. examining tissue samples from patients. They will also combine the new X-ray source with other systems, such as phase contrast. The group headed by Pfeiffer has developed and refined the new X-ray phase-contrast technique.

For more information: www.tum.de

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