Feature | February 24, 2012

Mummy’s Secrets No Longer Under Wraps Thanks to 3-D CT

A scarab amulet on the forehead of the mummy.

Amulet found on the mummy's spine.

Mummy's inner wrappings shown with some of amulets that were imbedded in the layers.

February 23, 2012 — Computed tomography (CT) and advanced visualization software has allowed researchers to virtually unwrap a 2000-year-old mummy at the National Museums Scotland. Together with a team of radiologists and a forensic pathologist from Edinburgh University, a great deal has been learned about this female mummy, who died when she was in her mid-to-late twenties.

Two thousand years ago, using state-of-the-art mummification techniques, a mummy was entombed in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes. Now, using state-of-the-art CT and High Definition Volume Rendering (HDVR) software from Fovia Inc., the National Museums Scotland was able to virtually unwrap the artifact.

The mummy, known as the Rhind Mummy, was discovered by Alexander H. Rhind, a 24-year-old Scottish Egyptologist who brought her back to Scotland in 1857.  Rhind, a brilliant scholar known for his systematic work, left the contents untouched, which was unusual during the time of “Mummy Mania” when mummy unwrappings were common.  He was critical of so-called “archaeologists” whom he claimed indulged in little more than looting by unwrapping mummies, as it destroyed the carefully preserved relics.  Given his non-destructive philosophy, it’s likely that Rhind would have appreciated how scientists today, using high resolution CT scans and Fovia’s HDVR Connect software, have gained new forensic insights through the lens of advanced imaging technology.

“Having the chance to view the Rhind Mummy in three dimensions is amazing in its own right, but having the chance to view her with Fovia's software brings a new level of clarity and depth to the viewing experience, allowing for more accurate analysis and interpretation,” said Jim Tate, head of conservation and analytical research at National Museums Scotland.

He said Fovia creates a clear, 3-D view of the mummy, with intricate details down to the concealed ornamentation that has lain unseen for more than two millennia.  In fact, HDVR Connect helps reveal that some of the surface amulets have hidden.

The team discovered details about the mummy without having to unwrap the delicate bandages that preserved the body and hid many amulets.  They found a metal disc on her stomach, an amulet on her skull, and a scroll being clutched in her right hand – likely to be a funerary text that combines directions for mummification with guidance for the afterlife, and probably contains the mummy’s lineage and name.

Rhind wrote that the mummy was “a handsome specimen of the style of ornamenting externally, by means of inlaid or impressed emblems of gold and colored vitreous composition.” Now, with Fovia’s HDVR Connect software, scientists have learned how the body was prepared for eternity, including the locations and textures of the internal amulets as well as those that had been placed on her body during the intricate wrapping process.  Fovia’s fly-through movie virtually unwraps the mummy, providing a detailed and lifelike view of her in 3-D without being disruptive to the original embalming.

The Fascinating Mummies exhibit opened Feb. 11, 2012 at the National Museum of Scotland, and features Fovia’s 3-D fly-through movie of the Rhind Mummy next to the actual mummy. The exhibition examines death and afterlife in ancient Egypt and includes a spectacular array of Egyptian items from National Museums Scotland and Rijkesmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden, The Netherlands. 

For more information: www.fovia.com

 

Related Mummy and Archological Cardiology Content:

Mummy CT Scans Show No Significant Differences in Atherosclerotic Disease in Modern vs. Ancient Egyptians

Egyptian Mummies Show Earliest Cases of Coronary Disease on CT

Mummy’s Secrets No Longer Under Wraps Thanks to 3-D CT

Study Reveals Evidence of Heart Disease in Ancient Egyptian Mummies

Imaging Yields Evidence of Heart Disease in Archeological Find

 

Related Content

Report Finds Identifying Patients for Lung Cancer Screening Not So Simple
News | Lung Cancer | June 18, 2018
New findings in the current issue of The American Journal of Managed Care suggest that getting the right patients to...
3D Systems Announces On Demand Anatomical Modeling Service
Technology | Medical 3-D Printing | June 18, 2018
3D Systems announced availability of its new On Demand Anatomical Modeling Service. This new service provides a wide...
Weight-Bearing CT International Study Group Hosts  Scientific Session at AOFAS Conference
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 15, 2018
June 15, 2018 —The Weight-Bearing CT International Study Group will host a scientific session on the benefits of weig
Florida Hospital First in State to Adopt NeuroLogica's BodyTom Elite CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2018
June 14, 2018 — NeuroLogica, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co.
Riverain Technologies Issued U.S. Patent for Vessel Suppression Technology
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | June 14, 2018
Riverain Technologies announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has awarded the company a...
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | June 14, 2018
This is a 360 degree image from the Canon Aquilion 64-slice...
Technology | Orthopedic Imaging | June 13, 2018
EOS imaging announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its hipEOS...
American Society of Neuroradiology Honors Peter Chang with Cornelius G. Dyke Memorial Award
News | Neuro Imaging | June 13, 2018
Peter Chang, M.D., current neuroradiology fellow at UCSF and recently recruited co-director of the UCI Center for...
Reduced hippocampal volume on MRI

This figure shows reduced hippocampal volume over the course of 6 years as seen on progressive volumetric analysis and also coronal MRI evaluations (arrows).Progressive volume loss in the mesial temporal lobe on MRI is a characteristic imaging feature of AD. This patient was a case of Alzheimer’s Dementia.

 

News | Neuro Imaging | June 12, 2018
According to a UCLA Medical Center study, a new technology shows the potential to help doctors better determine when...
NewYork-Presbyterian Expands Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit Fleet

Image courtesy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

News | Stroke | June 11, 2018
NewYork-Presbyterian, in collaboration with Weill Cornell Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the...
Overlay Init