Feature | June 19, 2015

Carestream and UBMD Orthopedics Begin Cone Beam CT Clinical Studies

Two groups collaborating to develop a new compact system for weight-bearing 3-D imaging

Carestream, UBMD, cone beam CT, CBCT, UBMD Orthopedics, clinical studies

June 19, 2015 - Carestream and UBMD Orthopedics & Sports Medicine are conducting clinical studies on a new three-dimensional medical imaging system at the Erie County Medical Center (ECMC) for use in treating orthopedic conditions. These studies will help guide Carestream's development of new cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with the goal of providing orthopedic solutions for hospitals, clinics and sports medicine providers that use less radiation than traditional CT; are compact and affordable; and could be used in a wide range of facilities.

Physicians from UBMD Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine - all experts in caring for patients with musculoskeletal problems - are working with Carestream researchers to explore the benefits of using CBCT technology for capturing images of patient extremities (knees, legs, feet, arms and hands). Musculoskeletal diseases affect more than one out of every two persons in the United States age 18 and over, and nearly three out of four age 65 and over.

With new digital CBCT technology, healthcare providers can acquire otherwise unavailable weight-bearing images of knees, legs and feet, which are of particular interest to orthopedic and sports medicine specialists. The CBCT system used in this study is investigational and not available for commercial sale. The two organizations plan to broaden their collaboration at a later date to study the advantages of digital imaging technology in treating other extremity conditions.

The Erie County Medical Center is an advanced regional medical center and major teaching facility of the University at Buffalo. A member of the Great Lakes Health System of Western New York, ECMC is the Adult Regional Trauma Center and operates 602 licensed beds located in Buffalo, New York.

"We think the novel capabilities of the Carestream CBCT scanner have broad application to the basic science and clinical practice of orthopedics and sports medicine. We are launching an initial clinical study that may help surgeons more accurately and objectively diagnose the degree of instability of the patella (knee cap)," explained John Marzo, M.D., a physician with UBMD Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, associate professor of clinical orthopaedics, School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, and former medical director, Buffalo Bills.

"A second collaborative project will validate the ability of the CBCT scanner to measure contact area inside the knee joint, which will be valuable in a host of clinical situations. We have several other projects in various stages of development to be performed over the next 2-3 years that establish a mutually beneficial relationship with Carestream Health," Marzo added. 

For more information: www.carestream.com

Related Content

Novel Technique May Significantly Reduce Breast Biopsies
News | Breast Biopsy Systems | January 17, 2019
A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce...
Digital Mammography Increases Breast Cancer Detection
News | Mammography | January 16, 2019
The shift from film to digital mammography increased the detection of breast cancer by 14 percent overall in the United...
Artificial Intelligence Used in Clinical Practice to Measure Breast Density
News | Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm measures breast density at the level of an experienced mammographer,...
Machine Learning Uncovers New Insights Into Human Brain Through fMRI
News | Neuro Imaging | January 11, 2019
An interdisciplinary research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully...
Mobile App Data Collection Shows Promise for Population Health Surveys
News | Population Health | January 10, 2019
Mobile app data collection can bring access to more potential clinical study participants, reduce clinical study...
3-D Reconstruction of Ichthyosaurus Skull

A 3-D reconstruction of the ichthyosaurus skull from a computed tomography (CT) scan. Image courtesy of Nigel Larkin, taken at Royal Veterinary College, London.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 09, 2019
A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has...
SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has released a new expert consensus document for computed...
Hypertension With Progressive Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Increases Cognitive Impairment Risk
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2019
Patients with high blood pressure and progression of periventricular white matter hyperintensities showed signs of...
Artificial Intelligence Pinpoints Nine Different Abnormalities in Head Scans

A brain scan (left) showing an intraparenchymal hemorrhage in left frontal region and a scan (right) of a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the left parietal region. Both conditions were accurately detected by the Qure.ai tool. Image courtesy of Nature Medicine.

News | Artificial Intelligence | January 07, 2019
The rise in the use of computed tomography (CT) scans in U.S. emergency rooms has been a well-documented trend1 in...
Electronic Brachytherapy Effective in Long-Term Study of 1,000 Early-Stage Breast Cancers
News | Brachytherapy Systems, Women's Healthcare | January 07, 2019
Breast cancer recurrence rates of patients treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) using the Xoft Axxent...