Feature | March 03, 2015

3-D Printing Offers Innovative Method to Deliver Medication

Interventional radiologists use 3-D printers to develop personalized medical devices to deliver antibiotics, chemotherapy in targeted manner

March 3, 2015 — A study being presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s annual scientific meeting says 3-D printing could become a powerful tool in customizing interventional radiology treatments to individual patient needs. With the technology, clinicians would have the ability to construct devices to a specific size and shape. Researchers and engineers collaborated to print catheters, stents and filaments that were bioactive, giving these devices the ability to deliver antibiotics and chemotherapeutic medications to a targeted area in cell cultures.

"3-D printing allows for tailor-made materials for personalized medicine," said Horacio R. D'Agostino, M.D., FSIR, lead researcher and an interventional radiologist at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUH) in Shreveport. "It gives us the ability to construct devices that meet patients' needs, from their unique anatomy to specific medicine requirements. And as tools in interventional radiology, these devices are part of treatment options that are less invasive than traditional surgery," he added.

Using 3-D printing technology and resorbable bioplastics, D'Agostino and his team of biomedical engineers and nanosystem engineers at LSUH and Louisiana Tech University developed bioactive filaments, chemotherapy beads, and catheters and stents containing antibiotics or chemotherapeutic agents. The team then tested these devices in cell cultures to see if they could inhibit growth of bacteria and cancer cells.

When testing antibiotic-containing catheters that could slowly release the drug, D'Agostino's team found that the devices inhibited bacterial growth. Researchers also saw that filaments carrying chemotherapeutic agents were able to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

"We treat a wide variety of patients and, with some patients, the current one-size-fits-all devices are not an option," added D'Agostino. "3-D printing gives us the ability to craft devices that are better suited for certain patient populations that are traditionally tough to treat, such as children and the obese, who have different anatomy. There's limitless potential to be explored with this technology," he noted.

The research team is also able to print biodegradable filaments, catheters and stents that contain antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. These types of devices may help patients avoid the need to undergo a second procedure or treatment when conventional materials are used.

D'Agostino believes that this early success with 3-D-printed instruments in the lab warrants further studies, with the goal of receiving approval to use these devices in humans. He also sees an opportunity to collaborate with other medical specialties to deliver higher-quality, personalized care to all types of patients.

For more information: www.sirweb.org

Related Content

RSNA 2017 Celebrates Innovation in Radiology
News | Imaging | January 15, 2018
January 15, 2018 — The Radiological Society of North America’s...
Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

Lumbar spine MRI showing disc herniation and nerve root at baseline and one month after treatment

News | Interventional Radiology | January 11, 2018
The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back...

Size comparison between 3-D printed prosthesis implant and a penny.

News | 3-D Printing | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — Researchers using...
Guerbet Announces Acquisition of Accurate Medical Therapeutics
News | Interventional Radiology | January 08, 2018
Guerbet announced that it has entered into an agreement under which it will acquire Israeli company Accurate Medical...
FDA Announces Final Guidance and Webinar for Technical Considerations for 3-D-Printed Medical Devices
News | 3-D Printing | January 03, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the final version of the guidance, “Technical Considerations for...
ACR Appropriateness Criteria Adds and Revises Topics for December 2017
News | Clinical Decision Support | December 29, 2017
December 29, 2017 — Radiologists can enhance the quality and effectiveness of care with the newest release of the ACR
Philips Announces New 3-D Printing Integration With 3D Systems and Stratasys
News | 3-D Printing | December 21, 2017
Philips recently announced agreements with 3D Systems and Stratasys, two global leaders in the 3-D printing industry,...
Videos | RSNA 2017 | December 20, 2017
ITN and DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies on the
Philips IntelliSpace Portal 10 Highlighted by New 3-D Modeling Application
Technology | Advanced Visualization | December 13, 2017
Philips announced the debut of IntelliSpace Portal 10, the latest edition of its comprehensive, advanced visualization...
Videos | Advanced Visualization | December 07, 2017
Dianna Bardo M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3-D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children's Hospital, disc
Overlay Init