News | Information Technology | February 28, 2019

What is Next in Healthcare IT?

HIMSS19, health IT’s largest global event, points to interoperability, patient engagement as two of the industry’s priorities for the year ahead

What is Next in Healthcare IT?

February 28, 2019 — The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) shared insights on what’s next in health on the heels of the HIMSS19 global conference and exhibition, Feb. 11-15 in Orlando, Fla. This year’s event – which saw 43,000-plus attendees from 90 countries around the world and featured nearly 500 education sessions on 24 education topics – highlighted current industry priorities and offered a glimpse of what the industry can expect to see in the coming year.

Interoperability was a hot topic, with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) each unveiling sweeping and highly anticipated rules aimed at reducing information blocking and allowing patients easier access to their health data. Additionally, HIMSS Analytics released a new maturity model for enterprise imaging, an important step in establishing standards and benchmarks for a digitized imaging information technology (IT) environment. The HIMSS Interoperability Showcase, featuring demonstrations and use cases for today’s latest interoperability solutions, continued to be the most trafficked area of the exhibition floor.

Another theme that was top of mind for this year’s attendees was patient engagement. The HIMSS Patient Engagement & Experience Summit, a pre-conference specialty program, highlighted how patient-friendly technology is improving the care experience. More than 1,400 exhibitors showcased offerings to improve the patient experience, ranging from artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to precision medicine breakthroughs and more. Keynote sessions featuring public sector leaders from both the current and former administrations emphasized how digital health is maturing and empowering patients to take greater charge of their health.

These conference takeaways echo the findings of a new report HIMSS issued earlier in February, “2019 Healthcare Trends Forecast: The Beginning of a Consumer-Driven Reformation.” The report underscored how increased consumerization will be a significant driver of healthcare innovation and policy, including the need for digital health solutions to make treatment more personalized, as well as narrow gaps in care and coverage. The report also pointed to increased pressure to standardize systems for advanced interoperability to help improve the way information is shared and care is administered.

Additional coverage and videos from HIMSS19

For more information: www.himss.org

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