Sponsored Content | Webinar | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| January 08, 2018

WEBINAR: Neuroimaging From a Clinical MRI Perspective

This webinar is supported by an educational grant from Philips Healthcare

WEBINAR: Neuroimaging from a Clinical MRI Perspective, sponsored by Philips Healthcare. How to better manage your MRI department.

The webinar "Neuroimaging from a Clinical MRI Perspective," explains how imaging departments can become more creative to improve workflow and maintain positive financial margins in an era of lower reimbursements and increasing utilization.  This presentation discusses lessons learned in a clinically integrated neuroimaging/neurology practice that may be generalizable to all imaging centers. 

This webinar is supported by an educational grant from Philips Healthcare.

The webinar took place Jan. 30, 2018. Register to view the archive version of this webinar

 

Statement of Purpose

Institutions that integrate imaging into a clinical setting leverage the availability of ordering providers and their subspecialty expertise, have direct experience with treatment protocols and decision algorithms, share operational management between clinics and ancillary services, and have the opportunity to work on improved communication that can reduce errors in MRI ordering, authorization, scheduling, reimbursement, reporting and quality control processes.  With reimbursements dropping precipitously, together with an increase in utilization control, imaging departments must be creative to improve workflow and maintain positive financial margins.  This presentation discusses lessons learned in a clinically integrated neuro imaging/neurology practice that may be generalizable to all imaging centers.

 

Learning Objectives
 
Upon completion of this activity participants will be able to:
   • Gather from experiences in operating an integrated clinical/imaging practice to identify processes and key performance indicators that improve service quality and communication between ordering providers and the imaging department.

   • Identify inefficiencies in workflow, billing, and time management that contribute to decreased cost-effectiveness.

   • Discuss processes and technologies that can help improve workflow, customer satisfaction and cost effectiveness.

 

Intended Audience
This activity is intended for radiologists, neurologists, and radiology department administrators who are interested in identifying performance improvements with MRI exams, and creating workflow efficiencies to increase patient throughput and satisfaction.
 

 

Presenter

Joseph FritzJoseph V. Fritz, Ph.D.
Chief Executive Officer, Dent Neurologic Institute

Joseph V. Fritz PhD is the chief executive officer at Dent Neurologic Institute, which has grown to become one of the largest outpatient neurology centers in the U.S.  Fritz has more than 25 years of experience in medical management through executive roles in hospital and outpatient environments, and in medical device research and development as national director of clinical sciences. He is a regular presenter at American Academy of Neurology and American Society of Neuroimaging conferences and webinars, and has published numerous articles and editorials in Neurology: Clinical Practice, AAN Continuum, Neurologic Clinics, Practical Neurology and Applied Radiology. He is the vice-chair of the AAN Axon Registry Committee, past chair of AAN’s Business Section and co-chair of the advanced practice providers (APP) Workgroup, and has served on numerous AAN committees, including Imaging, Practice, Medical Economics and Management, Payment Policy, the Health Services Research Group, and Practice Management and Technology.

 

Register to view the archive version of this webinar

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