Sponsored Content | Webinar | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| September 07, 2017

WEBINAR: MRI Neuro Highlights and Clinical Advancements at Dent Neurologic Institute

This webinar is sponsored by Philips Healthcare

Philips Scan Wise MRI can speed MRI workflows. The scanner is a Philips Ingenia 1.5T MRI system.
As one of the largest outpatient neurological centers in the United States, Dent Neurologic Institute performs 120 MRI scans daily. To accommodate the tight scheduling, the Institute applies regular quality control and technical updates, achieving maximum scanner utilization and imaging quality. This entails the evaluation of performance and updates of older protocols with new techniques, as well as exploration and implementation of new technologies. 
 
This webinar presents examples of Dent’s quality-oriented protocol optimization strategies, including:
 
• 3T Philips Ingenia tips and tricks from the area of 3D imaging: Dent’s best 3D FLAIR; How to save time on spine scans; parameters that may be missed; examples of disease-specific protocols
 
• Newest Philips neuro techniques: Technical background and potential clinical applications of 3D spine view; 3D nerve view; 3D ASL; 4D TRANCE; zoom diffusion; multivane XD, and black blood
 
The webinar took place Sept. 28, 2017,and a recorded archive version of the webinar is available.
 
 
 
Presenter:
Nandor K. Pinter, M.D.
Director, Imaging Research and Quality Control
Dent Neurologic Institute
Amherst, N.Y. 
 
Pinter trained as a radiologist and has worked in different clinical environments (general radiology, cardiovascular, oncology, neurosurgery). His main interest is neuroradiology with a special focus on implementation of technological advancements and translation of clinical research findings to the clinical routine. The Dent Neurologic Institute provides an ideal environment, where strategies for marrying high speed with high-quality imaging can be incubated and tested in a demanding outpatient setting. The large patient volumes at Dent create an opportunity for clinically oriented studies. 
 
 
Register for to watch the archive version of this webinar

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