News | Breast Imaging | October 19, 2020

Volpara Solutions Becomes Volpara Health

Rebrand reflects Volpara Health's mission to prevent advanced-stage breast cancer

Rebrand reflects Volpara Health's mission to prevent advanced-stage breast cancer

October 19, 2020 — Volpara Solutions, a leader in AI-powered breast density assessment, announced that it has changed the company's name to Volpara Health. A purpose-driven software company on a mission to prevent advanced-stage breast cancer, Volpara Health is undergoing an extensive rebranding to better represent its commitment to helping save families from cancer.

"Advanced-stage breast cancer is a complicated, devastating illness in an often convoluted and confusing healthcare landscape. But if caught early, we can have much better outcomes for women and radically reduce medical costs," said Katherine Singson, Silicon Valley-based CEO of Volpara Health. "Powerful, targeted AI technology with increased patient engagement has the potential to significantly change the future of breast cancer." 

In addition to the name change, a new logo employs the Volpara "v" to form the spokes of a circle, a visual nod to the suite of products that come together to make up Volpara Health's integrated Breast Health Platform. Each aspect of this platform is powered by Volpara Science — a set of clinically validated algorithms for assessing breast tissue composition, compression, radiation dose and positioning quality, alongside breast cancer risk models — to personalize patient care.

"Volpara Health will continue to launch groundbreaking software tools to help detect more early-stage breast cancers. Our AI-based Breast Health Platform provides peace of mind, cost-savings and improved breast tissue assessment accuracy to benefit providers and patients," says Ralph Highnam, Ph.D., New Zealand-based technical founder and group CEO of Volpara Health Technologies. "This rebranding of our commercial arm reflects our goal of not only helping providers, but also communicating clear information, fully supported by science, which empowers women to participate in their own breast health journey and to remain healthy."

Artificial Intelligence is playing an increasingly important role in making detailed, objective assessments of the breast tissue possible. Volpara delivers numerous scores including precise breast composition percentages ("breast density") using AI and physics to support physicians in determining the best screening path for each individual.

More than thirteen million women across 39 countries have had their breast density assessed by Volpara. The company's software is installed in approximately 2,000 leading facilities worldwide, including top cancer centers in the United States. Volpara Health's technology has been the subject of more than 300 publications.

For more information: www.volparahealth.com

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