Technology | January 11, 2011

Vital Images - Vitrea Enterprise Suite 6.0 Offers New Clinical Features

Vital Images is a leader in advanced visualization solutions worldwide, partnering with several leading companies. Its technology is available anywhere, anytime, on the cloud, an iPad, laptop computer, in the home or office.

At RSNA 2010, the company introduced new solutions focusing on advanced clinical functionality, new workflows and oncology. It unveiled new clinical features available on the Vitrea Enterprise Suite 6.0, rolling out eight different new applications. They include software that does de-noising, or low-dose imaging, to complement what computed tomography (CT) scanners are doing to reduce dose. Vital Images' post-processing software takes that process to a deeper level.

Other new clinical functionalities introduced at RSNA include adding advanced magnetic resonance (MR) funtionality to the platform and new functionality around fusion oncology.

In addition, the company notes that its technology is VMware-certified, or virtualized, which can save users money on the back end. The company also has been recognized for its product service and support.

For more information: www.vitalimages.com

Related Content

Improving Molecular Imaging Using a Deep Learning Approach
News | Nuclear Imaging | March 21, 2019
Generating comprehensive molecular images of organs and tumors in living organisms can be performed at ultra-fast speed...
DrChrono and 3D4Medical Partner to Bring 3-D Interactive Modeling to Physician Practices
News | Advanced Visualization | March 18, 2019
DrChrono Inc. and 3D4Medical have teamed up so practices across the United States can access 3-D interactive modeling...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Sponsored Content | Videos | Enterprise Imaging | March 15, 2019
As a VNA, GE Healthcare Ce
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Collage depicts broad applications in machine learning or deep learning (DL) that can be applied to advanced medical imaging technologies. Size of the liver and its fat fraction — 22 percent — (top middle in collage) can be quantified automatically using an algorithm developed by Dr. Albert Hsiao and his team at the University of California San Diego. This and other information that might be mined by DL algorithms from CT and MR images could help personalize patients’ treatment. Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 11, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are chock full of information that might be used
FDA Grants Breakthrough Designation to Paige.AI
News | Digital Pathology | March 08, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) startup company Paige.AI has been granted Breakthrough Device designation by the U.S. Food...