News | September 28, 2010

Virtual Radiologic, Nighthawk Radiology Merge

September 28, 2010 – Virtual Radiologic (vRad), a national radiology practice and leader in the development of radiologist workflow technology, and NightHawk Radiology, a leading provider of radiology solutions to radiology groups across the United States, announced they have entered into a definitive agreement under which vRad will acquire all of the outstanding common stock of NightHawk Radiology Holdings Inc. for $6.50 per share in cash. The offer price represents a premium of 100 percent over NightHawk’s last closing stock price of $3.25 per share. The transaction is valued at approximately $170 million.
 
The combined entity will have 325 radiologists serving nearly 2,700 healthcare facilities across all 50 states and reading approximately 6 million studies annually. Additionally, more than 75 percent of the affiliated radiologists will be fellowship-trained subspecialists.

Upon the completion of the transaction, Rob Kill will continue to serve as president and CEO of the combined organization. Dave Engert will remain as a board advisor following the close of the transaction. The remainder of the leadership team will be drawn from the management teams of both companies. 

NightHawk’s board of directors unanimously approved the agreement and recommends that stockholders vote in favor of the transaction. The transaction is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2011, subject to customary closing conditions, including the approval of NightHawk’s stockholders. 

In connection with proposed transaction, NightHawk will file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) a preliminary proxy statement and mail a definitive proxy statement and other relevant documents regarding the proposed transaction to NightHawk's stockholders.

For more information: nighthawkrad.net or vrad.com

Related Content

vRad Receives 19th Patent
News | Teleradiology | April 10, 2019
vRad (Virtual Radiologic), a Mednax Radiology Solutions practice, announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office...
Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill. Interview with Mark Pankuch, Ph.D.

Four of the top pieces of content in March included news on proton therapy, including a 360 image and videos from ITN's recent visit to the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in the Chicago suburbs. This image shows the main proton treatment room gantry at the proton center in Warrenville, Ill.
 

Feature | April 02, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor and A.J. Connell
April 2, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology News (ITN) magazine w
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Collage depicts broad applications in machine learning or deep learning (DL) that can be applied to advanced medical imaging technologies. Size of the liver and its fat fraction — 22 percent — (top middle in collage) can be quantified automatically using an algorithm developed by Dr. Albert Hsiao and his team at the University of California San Diego. This and other information that might be mined by DL algorithms from CT and MR images could help personalize patients’ treatment. Collage provided by Albert Hsiao

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 11, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are chock full of information that might be used