News | March 03, 2009

Virginia Enacts Law to License Radiologist Assistants

March3, 2009 - Virginia Governor Tim Kaine has signed HB 1939 into law making Virginia the 24th state to license, regulate or recognize the radiologist assistant as a member of the radiology health care team.

This statute, which takes effect on July 1, 2009, provides for the licensure of radiologist assistants as individuals who have met the requirements of the Board of Medicine for licensure as advanced-level radiologic technologists. While under the direct supervision of a licensed doctor of medicine or osteopathy specializing in the field of radiology, RAs will be allowed to:

- Assess and evaluate the physiological and psychological responsiveness of patients undergoing radiologic procedures.
- Evaluate image quality, make initial observations and communicate observations to the supervising radiologist.
- Administer contrast media or other medications prescribed by the supervising radiologist.
- Perform or assist the supervising radiologist who is performing any other procedures consistent with the guidelines adopted by the American College of Radiology, the American Society of Radiologic Technologists and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.

“We are excited that radiologist assistants will be licensed by the state of Virginia and able to assist radiologists with providing patient care,” said Christine J. Lung, ASRT’s vice president of government relations and public policy. “ASRT believes that RAs will play an increasingly important role as radiologist extenders in a health care environment that is always trying to improve both productivity and efficiency, and ultimately increase the quality of health care for patients. This is especially important during a time when demands on the health care system are extreme and resources are limited.” Three additional states are reviewing RA licensure bills during their 2009 legislative sessions.

For more information: www.asrt.org

Related Content

Breathe Easy Bus from CHI Memorial in Chattanooga, TN. Image courtesy of CHI Memorial in Chattanooga, TN

Breathe Easy Bus from CHI Memorial in Chattanooga, TN. Image courtesy of CHI Memorial in Chattanooga, TN

News | Lung Imaging | July 15, 2020
June 15, 2020 — A mobile platform for lung cancer screening
The Mindways Solid phantom with volume of interest in the quality assurance phantom (red circles, left side). A participant's noncontrast-enhanced axial CT (right side) with volume of interest (yellow circles) in the trabecular bone compartment of three vertebrae for bone mineral density measurements. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

The Mindways Solid phantom with volume of interest in the quality assurance phantom (red circles, left side). A participant's noncontrast-enhanced axial CT (right side) with volume of interest (yellow circles) in the trabecular bone compartment of three vertebrae for bone mineral density measurements. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Cardiac Imaging | July 15, 2020
July 15, 2020 — ...
News | Information Technology | July 14, 2020
July 14, 2020 — The COVID-19 pandemic caused hea
Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — An open-access Ameri

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Mobile C-Arms | July 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Moblie C-arms have seen several advances over the past de
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Fujifilm’s Sonosite SII POC ultrasound system helps to keep crowded areas clearer with a small ultrasound footprint.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 07, 2020 | By Joan Toth
With the miniaturization of technology, improved ease of use, lower system cost, increased portability and greater ac