News | Nuclear Imaging | January 27, 2016

UltraSPECT Marks 450th U.S. System Installation

UltraSPECT partners with HeartLight Pharmacy Services to help nuclear medicine facilities deliver reduced radiation dose, shortened scan time for patient, staff safety

UltraSPECT, 450th U.S. installation, Firelands Regional Medical Center, nuclear medicine, radiation safety

January 27, 2016 — UltraSPECT Inc. has marked the 450th U.S. installation of its low-dose image processing technology for nuclear medicine. The milestone was reached as Firelands Regional Medical Center, Sandusky, Ohio, acquired Xpress3.Cardiac imaging solution to reduce radiation exposure for patients and staff and meet the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) dose-reduction guidelines.

UltraSPECT’s installation at Firelands Regional Medical Center was part of the HeartSafe Imaging initiative introduced by Ohio-based radiopharmaceutical provider HeartLight Pharmacy Services; the initiative is designed to help nuclear medicine facilities reduce single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiation exposure and minimize scan time for patient comfort. HeartLight Pharmacy Services offers UltraSPECT products to nuclear medicine imaging facilities as part of its supply agreement.

“Partnering with UltraSPECT allowed us to help our customers deliver a low-dose, safer cardiac imaging solution,” said Laura Meyer, sales and marketing manager, HeartLight Pharmacy Services. “Firelands Regional Medical Center is now providing the reduced dose and reduced time cardiac scans, making the imaging service safer for both patients and staff, and that can be seen as a true differentiator in the marketplace.”

The Heart Center at Firelands Regional Medical Center offers a broad range of advanced cardiac services, including nuclear cardiology scans. It is also accredited in heart failure, is a certified chest pain center and is an American Heart Association Mission Lifeline heart attack receiving center.

"UltraSPECT has given us the ability to reduce radiation exposure to both staff and patients, while providing a superior image quality," said Chad Baldosser, lead nuclear medicine technologist at Firelands Regional Medical Center.

Xpress.Cardiac allows cardiac imaging to be performed at half-time or half-dose thanks to UltraSPECT’s reconstruction algorithms technology, Wide-Beam Reconstruction (WBR). The WBR image processing software for nuclear cardiac and oncology imaging addresses the clinical need for significant reduction in injection dose and shortened scan times, boosting patient safety, throughput and comfort without sacrificing image quality and diagnostic confidence at a fraction of the cost of a brand-new camera.

“Once customers implement one of UltraSPECT solutions, they really like the technology,” said Meyer. “Some of our customers had their radiation dosimetry badge readings go down, and one site improved by as much as 40 percent.”

For more information: www.ultraspect.com

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