News | October 05, 2010

Ultrasound Transducer Repair Division

October 5, 2010 – A new ultrasound transducer repair division has been launched by an ultrasound systems provider, based on proprietary repair technology not previously available in the U.S. market. The repair service is designed to counter a growing emphasis in the industry on probe exchange programs.

MedPro Imaging will offer computer-based transducer repair services using state-of-the-art repair technology. The company estimates that transducer repair costs generally range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, with an average of about $1,500 on a standard transducer and an average of $5-8,000 for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducers. The average replacement cost for a standard probe ranges from $5,000 for a refurbished probe to $14,000 for a new probe and $14,000-20,000 for TEE replacement probes.

For more information: medproimaging.com

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